Selective averaging of rapidly presented individual trials using fMRI

Selective averaging of rapidly presented individual trials using fMRI A major limitation in conducting functional neuroimaging studies, particularly for cognitive experiments, has been the use of blocked task paradigms. Here we explored whether selective averaging techniques similar to those applied in event‐related potential (ERP) experiments could be used to demonstrate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to rapidly intermixed trials. In the first two experiments, we observed that for 1‐sec trials of full‐field visual checkerboard stimulation, the fMRI blood oxygenation level‐dependent (BOLD) signal summated in a roughly linear fashion across successive trials even at very short (2 sec and 5 sec) intertrial intervals, although subtle departures from linearity were observed. In experiments 3 and 4, we observed that it is possible to obtain robust activation maps for rapidly presented randomly mixed trial types (left‐ and right‐hemifield visual checkerboard stimulation) spaced as little as 2 sec apart. Taken collectively, these results suggest that selective averaging may enable fMRI experimental designs identical to those used in typical behavioral and ERP studies. The ability to analyze closely spaced single‐trial, or event‐related, signals provides for a class of experiments which cannot be conducted using blocked designs. Trial types can be randomly intermixed, and selective averaging based upon trial type and/or subject performance is possible. Hum. Brain Mapping 5:329–340, 1997. © 1997 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Brain Mapping Wiley

Selective averaging of rapidly presented individual trials using fMRI

Human Brain Mapping, Volume 5 (5) – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
1065-9471
eISSN
1097-0193
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0193(1997)5:5<329::AID-HBM1>3.0.CO;2-5
pmid
20408237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A major limitation in conducting functional neuroimaging studies, particularly for cognitive experiments, has been the use of blocked task paradigms. Here we explored whether selective averaging techniques similar to those applied in event‐related potential (ERP) experiments could be used to demonstrate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to rapidly intermixed trials. In the first two experiments, we observed that for 1‐sec trials of full‐field visual checkerboard stimulation, the fMRI blood oxygenation level‐dependent (BOLD) signal summated in a roughly linear fashion across successive trials even at very short (2 sec and 5 sec) intertrial intervals, although subtle departures from linearity were observed. In experiments 3 and 4, we observed that it is possible to obtain robust activation maps for rapidly presented randomly mixed trial types (left‐ and right‐hemifield visual checkerboard stimulation) spaced as little as 2 sec apart. Taken collectively, these results suggest that selective averaging may enable fMRI experimental designs identical to those used in typical behavioral and ERP studies. The ability to analyze closely spaced single‐trial, or event‐related, signals provides for a class of experiments which cannot be conducted using blocked designs. Trial types can be randomly intermixed, and selective averaging based upon trial type and/or subject performance is possible. Hum. Brain Mapping 5:329–340, 1997. © 1997 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Human Brain MappingWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1997

References

  • Multivariate multiple regression on fMRI data to map functionally distinct areas
    Maisog, Maisog; Courtney, Courtney; Van Horn, Van Horn; Haxby, Haxby
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging in a visual oddball task
    McCarthy, McCarthy; Luby, Luby; Gore, Gore; Goldman‐Rakic, Goldman‐Rakic

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