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Seeing Witness: Visuality and The Ethics of Testimony By Jane Blocker Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Seeing Witness: Visuality and The Ethics of Testimony By Jane Blocker Minneapolis, MN: University... Jane Blocker's book is a compilation of her reflections on stories, performances, contemporary art, historical, and individual traumas. Her objective is to understand the witness in relation to “the politics of the visual.” Blocker starts the book with her own perspective on the satellite photographs which Collin Powell used in his testimony on chemical weapons facilities in Iraq. She describes his interpretation of how these photographs, taken by an “anonymous camera in the sky”, overshadowed the testimony of the United Nations (UN) inspectors. Blocker describes this as one example of the “strategy of legitimizing the invisible witness” which she then shares with the reader throughout her book. The book is divided into three chapters: History, Technology, and Biopower. The first chapter includes a discussion on Western culture's reliance on “official history.” Blocker uses the example of a Native American performance which shows how history can be enriched by hearing from those who are not part of the majority whose account of history is taken as the truth. It mentions how the images in Western movies are taken as valid ways to see a culture which goes beyond the stereotypes superimposed on it. Blocker also explores the topic of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Seeing Witness: Visuality and The Ethics of Testimony By Jane Blocker Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.292
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jane Blocker's book is a compilation of her reflections on stories, performances, contemporary art, historical, and individual traumas. Her objective is to understand the witness in relation to “the politics of the visual.” Blocker starts the book with her own perspective on the satellite photographs which Collin Powell used in his testimony on chemical weapons facilities in Iraq. She describes his interpretation of how these photographs, taken by an “anonymous camera in the sky”, overshadowed the testimony of the United Nations (UN) inspectors. Blocker describes this as one example of the “strategy of legitimizing the invisible witness” which she then shares with the reader throughout her book. The book is divided into three chapters: History, Technology, and Biopower. The first chapter includes a discussion on Western culture's reliance on “official history.” Blocker uses the example of a Native American performance which shows how history can be enriched by hearing from those who are not part of the majority whose account of history is taken as the truth. It mentions how the images in Western movies are taken as valid ways to see a culture which goes beyond the stereotypes superimposed on it. Blocker also explores the topic of

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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