Seed demography of three co‐occurring Acer species in a Japanese temperate deciduous forest

Seed demography of three co‐occurring Acer species in a Japanese temperate deciduous forest Abstract. Seed demography of three co‐occurring Acer species in an old‐growth mixed deciduous forest in Japan was studied. Almost all of the seeds of A. mono germinated in the first spring, while those of A. palmatum var. amoenum showed a delay in germination of almost one year. A. rufinerve showed a rather opportunistic germination habit. Both A. palmatum var. amoenum and A. rufinerve form short‐term persistent seed banks, but without input of newly dispersed seeds they may become extinct in about one year. The seed bank for these two species is not as significant as for a typical pioneer species, and the seedling bank is important for all three species. Only a small proportion of the dispersed propagules contained viable embryos, mainly due to pollination failure or abortion (A. mono and A. palmatum var. amoenum), and invertebrate predation (A. rufinerve). For all three species, larger seed crops had a higher percentage of viable seeds. Even for these relatively small, wind‐dispersed seeds, the predation pressure was very high. A large part of the dispersed seeds was eaten by wood mice during the first winter (30–80 %). Estimation from the 5‐yr average of seed dispersal and seedling emergence showed that only 7–16 % of the dispersed viable seeds succeeded in germinating. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Seed demography of three co‐occurring Acer species in a Japanese temperate deciduous forest

Journal of Vegetation Science, Volume 6 (6) – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1995 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3236403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Seed demography of three co‐occurring Acer species in an old‐growth mixed deciduous forest in Japan was studied. Almost all of the seeds of A. mono germinated in the first spring, while those of A. palmatum var. amoenum showed a delay in germination of almost one year. A. rufinerve showed a rather opportunistic germination habit. Both A. palmatum var. amoenum and A. rufinerve form short‐term persistent seed banks, but without input of newly dispersed seeds they may become extinct in about one year. The seed bank for these two species is not as significant as for a typical pioneer species, and the seedling bank is important for all three species. Only a small proportion of the dispersed propagules contained viable embryos, mainly due to pollination failure or abortion (A. mono and A. palmatum var. amoenum), and invertebrate predation (A. rufinerve). For all three species, larger seed crops had a higher percentage of viable seeds. Even for these relatively small, wind‐dispersed seeds, the predation pressure was very high. A large part of the dispersed seeds was eaten by wood mice during the first winter (30–80 %). Estimation from the 5‐yr average of seed dispersal and seedling emergence showed that only 7–16 % of the dispersed viable seeds succeeded in germinating.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

  • Distribution of seedlings and saplings of Quercus robur in a grazed deciduous forest
    Andersson, Andersson
  • The maintenance of species‐richness in plant communities: the importance of the regeneration niche
    Grubb, Grubb
  • Ecology of seed dispersal
    Howe, Howe; Smallwood, Smallwood
  • Seed predation by animals
    Janzen, Janzen
  • Flower and fruit abortion: proximate causes and ultimate functions
    Stephenson, Stephenson
  • Irregular fruiting in Fraxinus excelsior
    Tapper, Tapper

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