Safety Nets and Scaffolds: Parental Support in the Transition to Adulthood

Safety Nets and Scaffolds: Parental Support in the Transition to Adulthood Using longitudinal data from the Youth Development Study (analytic sample N = 712), we investigate how age, adult role acquisition and attainments, family resources, parent–child relationship quality, school attendance, and life events influence support received from parents in young adulthood. Parental assistance was found to be less forthcoming for those who had made greater progress on the road to adulthood, signified by socioeconomic attainment and union formation. The quality of mother–child and father–child relationships affected parental support in different ways, positively for mothers, negatively for fathers. School enrollment, negative life events, and employment problems were associated with a greater likelihood of receiving support. The findings suggest that parents act as “scaffolding” and “safety nets” to aid their children's successful transition to adulthood. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Marriage and Family Wiley

Safety Nets and Scaffolds: Parental Support in the Transition to Adulthood

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2011
ISSN
0022-2445
eISSN
1741-3737
DOI
10.1111/j.1741-3737.2010.00815.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using longitudinal data from the Youth Development Study (analytic sample N = 712), we investigate how age, adult role acquisition and attainments, family resources, parent–child relationship quality, school attendance, and life events influence support received from parents in young adulthood. Parental assistance was found to be less forthcoming for those who had made greater progress on the road to adulthood, signified by socioeconomic attainment and union formation. The quality of mother–child and father–child relationships affected parental support in different ways, positively for mothers, negatively for fathers. School enrollment, negative life events, and employment problems were associated with a greater likelihood of receiving support. The findings suggest that parents act as “scaffolding” and “safety nets” to aid their children's successful transition to adulthood.

Journal

Journal of Marriage and FamilyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2011

References

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