Rotary drum soil blending for source zone remediation: Various application scenarios

Rotary drum soil blending for source zone remediation: Various application scenarios Mechanical blending of contaminated soil with amendments has recently reemerged as an important treatment technology. From its original application using large‐diameter augers in the early 1990s to the current use of rotary drum blenders, soil blending is being used as an alternative to other remediation technologies like amendment injection and soil vapor and groundwater extraction. Shallow (approximately 10 m below ground surface [bgs] or less) soil blending also offers an alternative to excavation and disposal. Soil blending has been used to remediate a site with various contaminants including, but not limited to, chlorinated solvents, petroleum, and metals. The types of soils susceptible to soil blending vary from sands and gravels to silts and clays to fractured rock and combinations of all of these. The types of amendments blended include oxidants, reducing agents, biological enhancements, and stabilizing amendments. Soil blending systems deliver the power to the mixing head to adequately mix the soil and amendment to enhance remediation effectiveness. Since long‐term contamination is often a result of heterogeneously distributed residual contaminant in localized source zones that are difficult to access, the typical aim of soil blending is to homogenize the soil while effectively distributing amendment to these zones made accessible by blending. By effectively homogenizing the soil, however, soil blending will increase the void ratio and disrupt the shear strength and bearing capacity of the soil so an important component of a soil blending technology is proper recovery of these geotechnical parameters. This can be achieved by using well‐known soil improvement techniques such as amending all or a portion of the blended area with Portland cement or lime. Several case studies of soil blending treatments of different contaminants and amendments in various soil types are provided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Remediation Wiley

Rotary drum soil blending for source zone remediation: Various application scenarios

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/rotary-drum-soil-blending-for-source-zone-remediation-various-kz3Fn0loqM
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company
ISSN
1051-5658
eISSN
1520-6831
D.O.I.
10.1002/rem.21560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mechanical blending of contaminated soil with amendments has recently reemerged as an important treatment technology. From its original application using large‐diameter augers in the early 1990s to the current use of rotary drum blenders, soil blending is being used as an alternative to other remediation technologies like amendment injection and soil vapor and groundwater extraction. Shallow (approximately 10 m below ground surface [bgs] or less) soil blending also offers an alternative to excavation and disposal. Soil blending has been used to remediate a site with various contaminants including, but not limited to, chlorinated solvents, petroleum, and metals. The types of soils susceptible to soil blending vary from sands and gravels to silts and clays to fractured rock and combinations of all of these. The types of amendments blended include oxidants, reducing agents, biological enhancements, and stabilizing amendments. Soil blending systems deliver the power to the mixing head to adequately mix the soil and amendment to enhance remediation effectiveness. Since long‐term contamination is often a result of heterogeneously distributed residual contaminant in localized source zones that are difficult to access, the typical aim of soil blending is to homogenize the soil while effectively distributing amendment to these zones made accessible by blending. By effectively homogenizing the soil, however, soil blending will increase the void ratio and disrupt the shear strength and bearing capacity of the soil so an important component of a soil blending technology is proper recovery of these geotechnical parameters. This can be achieved by using well‐known soil improvement techniques such as amending all or a portion of the blended area with Portland cement or lime. Several case studies of soil blending treatments of different contaminants and amendments in various soil types are provided.

Journal

RemediationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off