ROLE CONFLICT AND FLEXIBLE WORK ARRANGEMENTS: THE EFFECTS ON APPLICANT ATTRACTION

ROLE CONFLICT AND FLEXIBLE WORK ARRANGEMENTS: THE EFFECTS ON APPLICANT ATTRACTION This paper challenges a popular assumption that organizations with flexible work arrangements are more attractive to job seekers than those with a standard work arrangement. Drawing on boundary theory, we suggest that the attractiveness of these arrangements depends in part on job seekers' interrole conflict. Subjects were 142 MBA students at a midsized midwestern university. Those with high role conflict were more attracted to an organization when flextime was offered than when it was not. Those with low role conflict, however, were just slightly less attracted to an organization when flextime was offered. Conversely, subjects with low role conflict were more attracted to an organization when telecommuting was offered than when it was not; subjects with high role conflict were indifferent. These results suggest that organizations should understand the needs of their targeted applicant pool and carefully consider recruitment implications of work arrangements when analyzing costs associated with these policies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

ROLE CONFLICT AND FLEXIBLE WORK ARRANGEMENTS: THE EFFECTS ON APPLICANT ATTRACTION

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1744-6570.2002.tb00105.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper challenges a popular assumption that organizations with flexible work arrangements are more attractive to job seekers than those with a standard work arrangement. Drawing on boundary theory, we suggest that the attractiveness of these arrangements depends in part on job seekers' interrole conflict. Subjects were 142 MBA students at a midsized midwestern university. Those with high role conflict were more attracted to an organization when flextime was offered than when it was not. Those with low role conflict, however, were just slightly less attracted to an organization when flextime was offered. Conversely, subjects with low role conflict were more attracted to an organization when telecommuting was offered than when it was not; subjects with high role conflict were indifferent. These results suggest that organizations should understand the needs of their targeted applicant pool and carefully consider recruitment implications of work arrangements when analyzing costs associated with these policies.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2002

References

  • Pay preferences and job search decision: A person‐organization fit perspective
    Cable, Cable; Judge, Judge
  • Patterns of telecommuting and their consequences: Framing the research agenda
    Feldman, Feldman; Gainey, Gainey
  • Influences of the virtual office on aspects of work and work/life balance
    Hill, Hill; Miller, Miller; Weiner, Weiner; Colihan, Colihan
  • Determinants of MIS employees' turnover intentions: A structural equation model
    Igbaria, Igbaria; Greenhaus, Greenhaus
  • Role stressors, social support, and well‐being among two career couples
    Parasuraman, Parasuraman; Greenhaus, Greenhaus; Granrose, Granrose
  • Relationships of gender, family responsibility and flexible work hours to organizational commitment and job satisfaction
    Scandura, Scandura; Lankau, Lankau

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