Robotic radiosurgery of head and neck paragangliomas: a single institution experience

Robotic radiosurgery of head and neck paragangliomas: a single institution experience 1INTRODUCTIONParagangliomas (PGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors, which are derived from either parasympathetic or sympathetic paraganglia. Parasympathetic ganglia‐derived PGLs are mostly located at the neck and skull base region. Head and neck PGLs (HNPGLs), formerly known as glomus tumors mostly occurs in the bifurcation of carotid arteries (carotid body PGL), tympanic area (tympanic PGL), the dome of internal jugular vein (jugular PGL) and along the vagal nerve (vagal PGL).The specific incidence of PGLs are unknown as they are usually reported together with other pheochromocytomas. The annual incidence of pheochromocytoma/PGLs has been estimated to be 0.8 per 100.000 person / year. PGLs are mostly discovered in the fourth and fifth decades of life. HNPGL patients tend to be older than abdominal PGLs at the time of diagnosis (43 years vs. 36 years of age). The male‐to‐female ratio of PGLs are usually equal.Most of PGLs have benign nature and have manageable size (the average volume was 17.1 cm3 for HNPGLs and 94.1 cm3 for other tumors). A wait and scan approach is often advised as the majority of HNGPLs have slow growing character. Although HNPGLs are generally benign tumors, tumor bulk may result neurovascular structure damage by cranial nerve deficits and cause http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology Wiley

Robotic radiosurgery of head and neck paragangliomas: a single institution experience

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1743-7555
eISSN
1743-7563
D.O.I.
10.1111/ajco.12695
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1INTRODUCTIONParagangliomas (PGLs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors, which are derived from either parasympathetic or sympathetic paraganglia. Parasympathetic ganglia‐derived PGLs are mostly located at the neck and skull base region. Head and neck PGLs (HNPGLs), formerly known as glomus tumors mostly occurs in the bifurcation of carotid arteries (carotid body PGL), tympanic area (tympanic PGL), the dome of internal jugular vein (jugular PGL) and along the vagal nerve (vagal PGL).The specific incidence of PGLs are unknown as they are usually reported together with other pheochromocytomas. The annual incidence of pheochromocytoma/PGLs has been estimated to be 0.8 per 100.000 person / year. PGLs are mostly discovered in the fourth and fifth decades of life. HNPGL patients tend to be older than abdominal PGLs at the time of diagnosis (43 years vs. 36 years of age). The male‐to‐female ratio of PGLs are usually equal.Most of PGLs have benign nature and have manageable size (the average volume was 17.1 cm3 for HNPGLs and 94.1 cm3 for other tumors). A wait and scan approach is often advised as the majority of HNGPLs have slow growing character. Although HNPGLs are generally benign tumors, tumor bulk may result neurovascular structure damage by cranial nerve deficits and cause

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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