Risks of different skin tumour combinations after a first melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma in Dutch population‐based cohorts: 1989–2009

Risks of different skin tumour combinations after a first melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and... IntroductionSkin cancer patients are known to be at increased risk of developing subsequent skin cancers due to shared risk factors: large parts of their skin have usually been exposed to mutagenic changes as a result of exposure to UV radiation or other carcinogens. This so‐called field cancerization in combination with the generally good prognosis of adequately treated skin cancer gives ample opportunity for new skin cancers to develop. Other shared risk factors like genetics and immune suppression might further increase the occurrence of subsequent skin cancers.Two meta‐analyses reported pooled risks for a subsequent melanoma or keratinocyte carcinoma (KC, including squamous cell carcinoma [SCC] and basal cell carcinoma, [BCC]) in melanoma and KC patients. A previous melanoma was shown to be a strong predictor for development of a subsequent melanoma (pooled standardized incidence ratio [SIR]: 10.4) and to a lesser extent of a subsequent KC: SIR 2.8–4.6. A prior KC is a very strong predictor of a subsequent KC, with a mean 5‐year cumulative risk 36.2% and to a less extent melanoma (pooled proportion 0.5%). The majority of previous studies, included in the meta‐analyses or published thereafter, only reported proportions of patients developing subsequent skin cancers. Proportions are quite an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology Wiley

Risks of different skin tumour combinations after a first melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma in Dutch population‐based cohorts: 1989–2009

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
ISSN
0926-9959
eISSN
1468-3083
D.O.I.
10.1111/jdv.14587
Publisher site
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Abstract

IntroductionSkin cancer patients are known to be at increased risk of developing subsequent skin cancers due to shared risk factors: large parts of their skin have usually been exposed to mutagenic changes as a result of exposure to UV radiation or other carcinogens. This so‐called field cancerization in combination with the generally good prognosis of adequately treated skin cancer gives ample opportunity for new skin cancers to develop. Other shared risk factors like genetics and immune suppression might further increase the occurrence of subsequent skin cancers.Two meta‐analyses reported pooled risks for a subsequent melanoma or keratinocyte carcinoma (KC, including squamous cell carcinoma [SCC] and basal cell carcinoma, [BCC]) in melanoma and KC patients. A previous melanoma was shown to be a strong predictor for development of a subsequent melanoma (pooled standardized incidence ratio [SIR]: 10.4) and to a lesser extent of a subsequent KC: SIR 2.8–4.6. A prior KC is a very strong predictor of a subsequent KC, with a mean 5‐year cumulative risk 36.2% and to a less extent melanoma (pooled proportion 0.5%). The majority of previous studies, included in the meta‐analyses or published thereafter, only reported proportions of patients developing subsequent skin cancers. Proportions are quite an

Journal

Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & VenereologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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