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Reviews of Films Anonymous and Last Will. and Testament

Reviews of Films Anonymous and Last Will. and Testament Roland Emmerich's 2011 film, Anonymous , is inspired by the same theory that fascinated Sigmund Freud during the last dozen years of his life – namely, the hypothesis that “William Shake‐Speare” (as Ben Jonson once spelled the name) was the pseudonym of Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford (1550–1604). The film has generated much debate, some of it acrimonious. Why should this be? This film challenges widely accepted “truths.” And those ostensible truths are intertwined with an idealizing transference to the bard. Freud observed that we know so little about the traditional author that we can imagine he was every bit as great as his works are. The film won six German Film Awards. The acting in the film has won praise from many critics. Vanessa Redgrave portrays the older Queen Elizabeth most convincingly, while her daughter Joely Richardson is the younger Elizabeth. Rhys Ifans departs from his past film roles to become the older Edward de Vere. He brings to life de Vere's intensity, his passion for writing, his reckless impulsivity, and his resigned awareness that he would not receive credit for his politically polemical works. Anonymous chooses one among many possible narratives as to the how http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Reviews of Films Anonymous and Last Will. and Testament

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1433
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Roland Emmerich's 2011 film, Anonymous , is inspired by the same theory that fascinated Sigmund Freud during the last dozen years of his life – namely, the hypothesis that “William Shake‐Speare” (as Ben Jonson once spelled the name) was the pseudonym of Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford (1550–1604). The film has generated much debate, some of it acrimonious. Why should this be? This film challenges widely accepted “truths.” And those ostensible truths are intertwined with an idealizing transference to the bard. Freud observed that we know so little about the traditional author that we can imagine he was every bit as great as his works are. The film won six German Film Awards. The acting in the film has won praise from many critics. Vanessa Redgrave portrays the older Queen Elizabeth most convincingly, while her daughter Joely Richardson is the younger Elizabeth. Rhys Ifans departs from his past film roles to become the older Edward de Vere. He brings to life de Vere's intensity, his passion for writing, his reckless impulsivity, and his resigned awareness that he would not receive credit for his politically polemical works. Anonymous chooses one among many possible narratives as to the how

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2015

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