Review article: the patient with gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease – lifestyle advice and medication

Review article: the patient with gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease – lifestyle advice and... Summary Gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent disorder in all Western countries. Interestingly, prevalence rates appear to be increasing in these countries, with a remarkable increase of GERD‐related lethal and nonlethal complications. However, these complications are rare on a global scale. This review aims to summarize the current concepts of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that need to be considered whilst caring for patients with these disorders. GERD is defined by the augmented exposure of oesophageal mucosa to acidic content, and is associated with specific symptoms or mucosal lesions. A number of factors may contribute to the manifestation of GERD. Although recent studies emphasize the role of genetic factors, there are many other risk factors that play a pivotal role in the development of GERD and GERD complications. Some nutritional factors are believed to aggravate acidic reflux either by delaying gastric emptying or diminishing the pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincters. Patients are often advised to sleep with their heads elevated, but this advice is not easy to follow and has not been proven effective with regard to long‐term outcome. Other lifestyle modifications include changes to the patient's diet, which are important but not frequently sufficient. Thus, medication is usually necessary for symptom control. Proton pump inhibitors are now mainstream treatment for the reduction of acid secretion in patients with severe manifestations and 4‐week healing rates are approaching 90%. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Wiley

Review article: the patient with gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease – lifestyle advice and medication

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/review-article-the-patient-with-gastro-oesophageal-reflux-disease-LWx1a38n81
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0269-2813
eISSN
1365-2036
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2036.2004.02224.x
pmid
15575868
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent disorder in all Western countries. Interestingly, prevalence rates appear to be increasing in these countries, with a remarkable increase of GERD‐related lethal and nonlethal complications. However, these complications are rare on a global scale. This review aims to summarize the current concepts of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that need to be considered whilst caring for patients with these disorders. GERD is defined by the augmented exposure of oesophageal mucosa to acidic content, and is associated with specific symptoms or mucosal lesions. A number of factors may contribute to the manifestation of GERD. Although recent studies emphasize the role of genetic factors, there are many other risk factors that play a pivotal role in the development of GERD and GERD complications. Some nutritional factors are believed to aggravate acidic reflux either by delaying gastric emptying or diminishing the pressure of the lower oesophageal sphincters. Patients are often advised to sleep with their heads elevated, but this advice is not easy to follow and has not been proven effective with regard to long‐term outcome. Other lifestyle modifications include changes to the patient's diet, which are important but not frequently sufficient. Thus, medication is usually necessary for symptom control. Proton pump inhibitors are now mainstream treatment for the reduction of acid secretion in patients with severe manifestations and 4‐week healing rates are approaching 90%.

Journal

Alimentary Pharmacology & TherapeuticsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month