Retrospective cohort mortality study of cancer among sewage plant workers

Retrospective cohort mortality study of cancer among sewage plant workers There is little known about the incidence of cancer among sewage workers. In this paper we examine findings from a retrospective cohort study of 487 white male sewer authority workers employed between January 1950 and October 1979. Vital status was ascertained for 93% of the cohort yielding a total of 6,886 person years. Total mortality from all causes was comparable to that of the general white male U.S. population (Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) = 0.91, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.77‐1.07). The cohort was subdivided into those not exposed, and sewer workers who were exposed to sewage effluent, sludge, or wastewater containing chemicals including potential carcinogens. Among the nonexposed group, mortality from all causes was significantly low (SMR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.33‐0.88). Among the exposed sewer workers, mortality from all causes was not significantly different from that of the general white male U.S. population (SMR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.84‐1.19). Mortality from all cancers among exposed sewer workers was slightly higher than that of the general population (SMR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.79‐1.7). Statistically significant elevated mortality ratios were seen for cancer of the larynx (SMR = 7.93, 95% CI = 1.59‐23.96), and cancer of the liver (SMR = 5.4, 95% CI = 1.10‐16.05). Careful study of the medical and occupational histories of these cases suggested that larynx cancer was possibly work‐related, while liver cancer was not. A group estimated to be the highest exposed, composed predominantly of operatives, had a higher directly adjusted death rate from all malignant neoplasms combined compared to all other workers (rate ratio = 1.64). These findings of increased risk of cancer among exposed sewage workers, especially operators, are based on small number of cases and should be interpreted with caution. Studies of larger cohorts are needed to clarify the risk of these cancers among sewage workers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Industrial Medicine Wiley

Retrospective cohort mortality study of cancer among sewage plant workers

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/retrospective-cohort-mortality-study-of-cancer-among-sewage-plant-CHsxUFP1q9
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0271-3586
eISSN
1097-0274
DOI
10.1002/ajim.4700190110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is little known about the incidence of cancer among sewage workers. In this paper we examine findings from a retrospective cohort study of 487 white male sewer authority workers employed between January 1950 and October 1979. Vital status was ascertained for 93% of the cohort yielding a total of 6,886 person years. Total mortality from all causes was comparable to that of the general white male U.S. population (Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) = 0.91, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.77‐1.07). The cohort was subdivided into those not exposed, and sewer workers who were exposed to sewage effluent, sludge, or wastewater containing chemicals including potential carcinogens. Among the nonexposed group, mortality from all causes was significantly low (SMR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.33‐0.88). Among the exposed sewer workers, mortality from all causes was not significantly different from that of the general white male U.S. population (SMR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.84‐1.19). Mortality from all cancers among exposed sewer workers was slightly higher than that of the general population (SMR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.79‐1.7). Statistically significant elevated mortality ratios were seen for cancer of the larynx (SMR = 7.93, 95% CI = 1.59‐23.96), and cancer of the liver (SMR = 5.4, 95% CI = 1.10‐16.05). Careful study of the medical and occupational histories of these cases suggested that larynx cancer was possibly work‐related, while liver cancer was not. A group estimated to be the highest exposed, composed predominantly of operatives, had a higher directly adjusted death rate from all malignant neoplasms combined compared to all other workers (rate ratio = 1.64). These findings of increased risk of cancer among exposed sewage workers, especially operators, are based on small number of cases and should be interpreted with caution. Studies of larger cohorts are needed to clarify the risk of these cancers among sewage workers.

Journal

American Journal of Industrial MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References

  • Occupational risks for laryngeal cancer
    Flanders, Flanders; Rothman, Rothman
  • Mortality of a municipal Worker Cohort: I. Males
    Vena, Vena; Sultz, Sultz; Fiedler, Fiedler; Barnes, Barnes; Carlo, Carlo
  • Mortality of a municipal Worker Cohort: III. Police Officers
    Vena, Vena; Violanti, Violanti; Marshall, Marshall; Fiedler, Fiedler

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off