Retardation of amygdaloid kindling in the rat by the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid

Retardation of amygdaloid kindling in the rat by the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid ZOE DENNISON AND DONALD P. CAIN Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2 There is substantial evidence for the involvement of excitatory amino acids (EAAs)in epileptic phenomena. Agonists of EAAs evoke strong seizure activity (Fukada et al., 1985; Hablitz, 1985; Stewart et al., 1972; Stone and Javid, 1983) and antagonists of EAAs antagonize audiogenic, pentylenetetrazol, and fully kindled seizures (Croucher et al., 1982; Herron et al., 1985; Peterson et al., 1983). We have demonstrated a prophylactic acid retardation effect of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric (APV), a specific antagonist of n-methyl-d aspartate (NMDA)receptors, on amygdaloid kindling in rats (Cain et al., 1988). E M S utilize a t least three receptor classes: kainate, quisqualate, and NMDA (Watkins and Evans, 1981). Although APV retards kindling, an experimental model of epilepsy (Racine, 1978), the effects of antagonists for other EAA receptor classes are unknown. Since agonists of kainate and quisqualate receptors can evoke powerful epileptiform responses (Lothman and Collins, 1981; Stewart et al., 1972; Watkins and Evans, 1981)it seems possible that an EAA antagonist that nonspecifically blocks all three receptor types might more strongly retard kindling than a specific blocker of NMDA receptors alone. This hypothesis was investigated by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Synapse Wiley

Retardation of amygdaloid kindling in the rat by the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid

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Abstract

ZOE DENNISON AND DONALD P. CAIN Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2 There is substantial evidence for the involvement of excitatory amino acids (EAAs)in epileptic phenomena. Agonists of EAAs evoke strong seizure activity (Fukada et al., 1985; Hablitz, 1985; Stewart et al., 1972; Stone and Javid, 1983) and antagonists of EAAs antagonize audiogenic, pentylenetetrazol, and fully kindled seizures (Croucher et al., 1982; Herron et al., 1985; Peterson et al., 1983). We have demonstrated a prophylactic acid retardation effect of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric (APV), a specific antagonist of n-methyl-d aspartate (NMDA)receptors, on amygdaloid kindling in rats (Cain et al., 1988). E M S utilize a t least three receptor classes: kainate, quisqualate, and NMDA (Watkins and Evans, 1981). Although APV retards kindling, an experimental model of epilepsy (Racine, 1978), the effects of antagonists for other EAA receptor classes are unknown. Since agonists of kainate and quisqualate receptors can evoke powerful epileptiform responses (Lothman and Collins, 1981; Stewart et al., 1972; Watkins and Evans, 1981)it seems possible that an EAA antagonist that nonspecifically blocks all three receptor types might more strongly retard kindling than a specific blocker of NMDA receptors alone. This hypothesis was investigated by

Journal

SynapseWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1989

References

  • Excitatory amino acid transmitters
    Watkins, Watkins; Evans, Evans

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