Results from a new model of river basin evolution

Results from a new model of river basin evolution This paper briefly describes a model of the erosional development of catchments and their channel networks. The model differentiates between the dominant transport processes in hillslope and channels. The development of channels and hillslopes occurs in an integrated manner as a function of physically observable mechanisms. The growth of a river basin is qualitatively described. The model concepts are used to study the basin during periods of growth (transient periods), as well as during dynamic equilibrium. This leads to hypotheses about the relationship between slopes, relief, tectonic uplift, erodability, runoff, and catchment area. It is shown that the model leads to very reasonable and desirable behaviour of hillslopes during retreat and degradation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Wiley

Results from a new model of river basin evolution

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Abstract

This paper briefly describes a model of the erosional development of catchments and their channel networks. The model differentiates between the dominant transport processes in hillslope and channels. The development of channels and hillslopes occurs in an integrated manner as a function of physically observable mechanisms. The growth of a river basin is qualitatively described. The model concepts are used to study the basin during periods of growth (transient periods), as well as during dynamic equilibrium. This leads to hypotheses about the relationship between slopes, relief, tectonic uplift, erodability, runoff, and catchment area. It is shown that the model leads to very reasonable and desirable behaviour of hillslopes during retreat and degradation.

Journal

Earth Surface Processes and LandformsWiley

Published: May 1, 1991

References

  • Dissipative systems, implications for geomorphology
    Huggett, Huggett
  • Theoretical investigation of the time variation of drainage density
    Kashiwaya, Kashiwaya
  • A classification of channel links in stream networks
    Mock, Mock
  • Stability and the conservation of mass in drainage basin evolution
    Smith, Smith; Bretherton, Bretherton

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