Responses of solitary retinal horizontal cells from Carassius auratus to L‐glutamate and related amino acids.

Responses of solitary retinal horizontal cells from Carassius auratus to L‐glutamate and... Effects of L‐glutamate and its analogues on membrane potentials of solitary horizontal cells were studied by intracellular recording. L‐glutamate depolarized these cells at micromolar concentrations (greater than or equal to 10 microM), while D‐glutamate and L‐alpha‐amino adipic acid produced slight depolarizations only at millimolar concentrations. Neither L‐ nor D‐aspartate, even at millimolar doses, produced any change in solitary horizontal‐cell resting potential. Solitary horizontal‐cell responses to L‐glutamate did not desensitize detectably. Responses to pairs of brief, ionophoretic pulses of L‐glutamate were nearly equal in amplitude at inter‐pulse intervals as short as 50 ms. Responses to maintained applications of low doses of L‐glutamate did not decline for as long as 2 min. Depolarizing responses were produced by ionophoretic applications of L‐glutamate near cell somata as well as dendrites. The mean sensitivity was 1.4 +/‐ 1.5 mV/nC with a maximum of 5.1 mV/nC. Depolarizing responses to L‐glutamate reversed in polarity at membrane potentials between 0 and ‐20 mV, were accompanied by a decrease in membrane slope resistance, and were suppressed by replacement of extracellular sodium ions with choline. These results demonstrate that chemosensitivity of retinal horizontal cells to acidic amino acids persists after dissociation protocols, and in several respects resembles that found in horizontal cells in situ. These findings are consistent with the notion that retinal horizontal cells receive a synaptic input involving L‐glutamate or a similar substance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

Responses of solitary retinal horizontal cells from Carassius auratus to L‐glutamate and related amino acids.

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 348 (1) – Mar 1, 1984

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/responses-of-solitary-retinal-horizontal-cells-from-carassius-auratus-nLSTJPY8dQ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2014 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
D.O.I.
10.1113/jphysiol.1984.sp015108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Effects of L‐glutamate and its analogues on membrane potentials of solitary horizontal cells were studied by intracellular recording. L‐glutamate depolarized these cells at micromolar concentrations (greater than or equal to 10 microM), while D‐glutamate and L‐alpha‐amino adipic acid produced slight depolarizations only at millimolar concentrations. Neither L‐ nor D‐aspartate, even at millimolar doses, produced any change in solitary horizontal‐cell resting potential. Solitary horizontal‐cell responses to L‐glutamate did not desensitize detectably. Responses to pairs of brief, ionophoretic pulses of L‐glutamate were nearly equal in amplitude at inter‐pulse intervals as short as 50 ms. Responses to maintained applications of low doses of L‐glutamate did not decline for as long as 2 min. Depolarizing responses were produced by ionophoretic applications of L‐glutamate near cell somata as well as dendrites. The mean sensitivity was 1.4 +/‐ 1.5 mV/nC with a maximum of 5.1 mV/nC. Depolarizing responses to L‐glutamate reversed in polarity at membrane potentials between 0 and ‐20 mV, were accompanied by a decrease in membrane slope resistance, and were suppressed by replacement of extracellular sodium ions with choline. These results demonstrate that chemosensitivity of retinal horizontal cells to acidic amino acids persists after dissociation protocols, and in several respects resembles that found in horizontal cells in situ. These findings are consistent with the notion that retinal horizontal cells receive a synaptic input involving L‐glutamate or a similar substance.

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1984

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off