Responses of apple leaf stomata: a model for single leaves and a whole tree

Responses of apple leaf stomata: a model for single leaves and a whole tree Abstract. An empirical model of stomatal response to environmental factors was developed from measurements of stomatal conductance (gs) made in a leaf chamber under controlled conditions. Results presented in a companion paper (Warrit, Landsberg & Thorpe, 1980) indicated that the model could be written in terms of only two factors, photon flux density (Qp) and leaf to air vapour pressure gradient (D). The response of Qp was hyperbolic and that to D linear; combining these the equation of the model is where gr is a reference conductance, α is the slope of the response to D and β indicates the sensitivity of gs response to Qp. Values of α were 0.20 and 0.30 kPa−1 in June and August; the corresponding values of β were 59 and 79 μmol m−2 s−1. The model was tested against mean values of gs obtained with a porometer in the field, using environmental measurements as inputs. Correspondence between measured and calculated values was good. Transpiration rates were calculated from the Penman‐Monteith equation, with stomatal resistance values calculated from the model, and compared with gravimetric measurements of tree water use. It was shown that transpiration could be calculated with acceptable accuracy. The effects of variations in stomatal resistance on transpiration rates under a range of conditions were explored using the model and the Penman‐ Monteith equation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Responses of apple leaf stomata: a model for single leaves and a whole tree

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/1365-3040.ep11580508
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. An empirical model of stomatal response to environmental factors was developed from measurements of stomatal conductance (gs) made in a leaf chamber under controlled conditions. Results presented in a companion paper (Warrit, Landsberg & Thorpe, 1980) indicated that the model could be written in terms of only two factors, photon flux density (Qp) and leaf to air vapour pressure gradient (D). The response of Qp was hyperbolic and that to D linear; combining these the equation of the model is where gr is a reference conductance, α is the slope of the response to D and β indicates the sensitivity of gs response to Qp. Values of α were 0.20 and 0.30 kPa−1 in June and August; the corresponding values of β were 59 and 79 μmol m−2 s−1. The model was tested against mean values of gs obtained with a porometer in the field, using environmental measurements as inputs. Correspondence between measured and calculated values was good. Transpiration rates were calculated from the Penman‐Monteith equation, with stomatal resistance values calculated from the model, and compared with gravimetric measurements of tree water use. It was shown that transpiration could be calculated with acceptable accuracy. The effects of variations in stomatal resistance on transpiration rates under a range of conditions were explored using the model and the Penman‐ Monteith equation.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1980

References

  • Photosynthesis and transpiration of an isolated tree: model and validation
    Thorpe, Thorpe; Saugier, Saugier; Auger, Auger; Berger, Berger; Methy, Methy

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