Research on Household Labor: Modeling and Measuring the Social Embeddedness of Routine Family Work

Research on Household Labor: Modeling and Measuring the Social Embeddedness of Routine Family Work This article reviews more than 200 scholarly articles and books on household labor published between 1989 and 1999. As a maturing area of study, this body of research has been concerned with understanding and documenting how housework is embedded in complex and shifting social processes relating to the well‐being of families, the construction of gender, and the reproduction of society. Major theoretical, methodological, and empirical contributions to the study of household labor are summarized, and suggestions for further research are offered. In summary, women have reduced and men have increased slightly their hourly contributions to housework. Although men's relative contributions have increased, women still do at least twice as much routine housework as men. Consistent predictors of sharing include both women's and men's employment, earnings, gender ideology, and life‐course issues. More balanced divisions of housework are associated with women perceiving fairness, experiencing less depression, and enjoying higher marital satisfaction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Marriage and Family Wiley

Research on Household Labor: Modeling and Measuring the Social Embeddedness of Routine Family Work

Journal of Marriage and Family, Volume 62 (4) – Nov 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-2445
eISSN
1741-3737
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1741-3737.2000.01208.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article reviews more than 200 scholarly articles and books on household labor published between 1989 and 1999. As a maturing area of study, this body of research has been concerned with understanding and documenting how housework is embedded in complex and shifting social processes relating to the well‐being of families, the construction of gender, and the reproduction of society. Major theoretical, methodological, and empirical contributions to the study of household labor are summarized, and suggestions for further research are offered. In summary, women have reduced and men have increased slightly their hourly contributions to housework. Although men's relative contributions have increased, women still do at least twice as much routine housework as men. Consistent predictors of sharing include both women's and men's employment, earnings, gender ideology, and life‐course issues. More balanced divisions of housework are associated with women perceiving fairness, experiencing less depression, and enjoying higher marital satisfaction.

Journal

Journal of Marriage and FamilyWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2000

References

  • The dilemma of housework: A feminist response to Gottman, Napier, and Pittman
    Braverman, Braverman
  • Gender as an organizing feature in parent‐child relationships
    Crouter, Crouter; McHale, McHale; Bartko, Bartko
  • Gender equality and gender differences in household work and parenting
    Doucet, Doucet
  • The strategic involvement of children in housework: An Australian case of two‐income families
    Gill, Gill
  • The production of gender among Black and White women and men: The case of household labor
    John, John; Shelton, Shelton
  • The allocation of household labor in gay, lesbian, and heterosexual married couples
    Kurdek, Kurdek
  • Gender, entitlement, and the distribution of family labor
    Major, Major
  • Children's housework and psychosocial functioning: The mediating effects of parents' sex‐role behaviors and attitudes
    McHale, McHale; Bartko, Bartko; Crouter, Crouter; Perry‐Jenkins, Perry‐Jenkins
  • Sex roles: The division of labor at home and in the workplace
    Miller, Miller; Garrison, Garrison
  • In search of mesostructure in the family: An interactionist approach to division of labor
    Pestello, Pestello; Voydanoff, Voydanoff
  • Introducing qualitative research on women in families and households
    Ribbens, Ribbens; Edwards, Edwards
  • The division of household labor
    Shelton, Shelton; John, John
  • Division of household and paid labour between partners: Effects of relative wage rates and social norms
    Van der Lippe, Van der Lippe; Siegers, Siegers
  • Understanding gendered inequality: Reconceptualizing housework
    VanEvery, VanEvery

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