Reproductive success and behavior of Japanese medaka ( Oryzias latipes ) exposed to 4‐ tert ‐octylphenol

Reproductive success and behavior of Japanese medaka ( Oryzias latipes ) exposed to 4‐ tert... Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small freshwater fish used extensively to investigate sexual differentiation and development, were exposed to octylphenol (OP), a known estrogen agonist, to assess its impact on reproductive success. Male and female medaka were exposed to nominal concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 μg/L OP from 1 d posthatch to 6 months posthatch. In reproduction trials involving exposed males and unexposed females, the males exposed to nominal concentrations of 25 and 50 μg/L showed a reduction in some courtship activity and overall reproductive success. Eggs produced by matings of exposed males and females demonstrated various developmental problems, including circulatory system difficulties, incomplete eye development (i.e., anisophthalmia), and failure to inflate swim bladders upon hatch. One male fish with an intersex gonad was able to fertilize the eggs of an unexposed female. This study is one of the first to show the possible behavioral and transgenerational effects of an estrogenic compound on the reproductive success and second generation embryo‐larval development of fish. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry Wiley

Reproductive success and behavior of Japanese medaka ( Oryzias latipes ) exposed to 4‐ tert ‐octylphenol

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 SETAC
ISSN
0730-7268
eISSN
1552-8618
DOI
10.1002/etc.5620181128
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), a small freshwater fish used extensively to investigate sexual differentiation and development, were exposed to octylphenol (OP), a known estrogen agonist, to assess its impact on reproductive success. Male and female medaka were exposed to nominal concentrations of 10, 25, 50, and 100 μg/L OP from 1 d posthatch to 6 months posthatch. In reproduction trials involving exposed males and unexposed females, the males exposed to nominal concentrations of 25 and 50 μg/L showed a reduction in some courtship activity and overall reproductive success. Eggs produced by matings of exposed males and females demonstrated various developmental problems, including circulatory system difficulties, incomplete eye development (i.e., anisophthalmia), and failure to inflate swim bladders upon hatch. One male fish with an intersex gonad was able to fertilize the eggs of an unexposed female. This study is one of the first to show the possible behavioral and transgenerational effects of an estrogenic compound on the reproductive success and second generation embryo‐larval development of fish.

Journal

Environmental Toxicology & ChemistryWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1999

References

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