Reply [to “Comment on ‘Modeling the Effects of Acid Deposition: Assessment of a Lumped Parameter Model of Soil Water and Stream Water Chemistry’ by B. J. Cosby et al.”]

Reply [to “Comment on ‘Modeling the Effects of Acid Deposition: Assessment of a Lumped... Reply B. J. COSBY, M. HORNBERGER, N. GALLOWAY,AND R. F. WRIGHT G. J. Department Environmental of Sciences, Universityof Virginia, Charlottesville Hooper and Driscoll(this issue)questionthe applicabilityof our lumped parametermodel of soil water chemistryfor the purposeof predictingpast and future acidificationof stream water under different loadings of atmosphericprecipitation because two particularaspects the structureof our model of of as presented Cosbyet al. [1985a]. As we and Hooper and by Driscollrecognize, waterinteractions, soil particularlyin natural catchments,are poorly understood. In developing our model, we consequently adopted a modular structureso that examination of effectsof using different functional forms for the various processesrepresentedcould be easily accomplished. These effectscannot be deduced,however, without resorting to the completelycoupled set of equationscomposingthe full dynamicmodel.The objective the paper by of Cosbyet al. [1985a], to whichHooper and Driscoll(thisissue) address their comment, was to assessthe adequacy of the equilibrium component of the full model by determining whether it was consistent with current data from White Oak scale.We certainly cannot concludethat a mass-actionequation is an inappropriate form for WOR. Of course, if soil solution chemistrywere to changeappreciablyover the long term in the simulation of some other system, then modifications to our model structure,such as the ones suggested by Hooper and Driscoll [this issue],would be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Reply [to “Comment on ‘Modeling the Effects of Acid Deposition: Assessment of a Lumped Parameter Model of Soil Water and Stream Water Chemistry’ by B. J. Cosby et al.”]

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/WR022i006p00999
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reply B. J. COSBY, M. HORNBERGER, N. GALLOWAY,AND R. F. WRIGHT G. J. Department Environmental of Sciences, Universityof Virginia, Charlottesville Hooper and Driscoll(this issue)questionthe applicabilityof our lumped parametermodel of soil water chemistryfor the purposeof predictingpast and future acidificationof stream water under different loadings of atmosphericprecipitation because two particularaspects the structureof our model of of as presented Cosbyet al. [1985a]. As we and Hooper and by Driscollrecognize, waterinteractions, soil particularlyin natural catchments,are poorly understood. In developing our model, we consequently adopted a modular structureso that examination of effectsof using different functional forms for the various processesrepresentedcould be easily accomplished. These effectscannot be deduced,however, without resorting to the completelycoupled set of equationscomposingthe full dynamicmodel.The objective the paper by of Cosbyet al. [1985a], to whichHooper and Driscoll(thisissue) address their comment, was to assessthe adequacy of the equilibrium component of the full model by determining whether it was consistent with current data from White Oak scale.We certainly cannot concludethat a mass-actionequation is an inappropriate form for WOR. Of course, if soil solution chemistrywere to changeappreciablyover the long term in the simulation of some other system, then modifications to our model structure,such as the ones suggested by Hooper and Driscoll [this issue],would be

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1986

References

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