Replicability and variability of the recent macrofossil and proxy‐climate record from raised bogs: field stratigraphy and macrofossil data from Bolton Fell Moss and Walton Moss, Cumbria, England

Replicability and variability of the recent macrofossil and proxy‐climate record from raised... Replication of results is a basic tenet of science, but in palaeoecology this is very time‐consuming and the ‘signal’ is subject to ‘noise’. The derivation of proxy‐climate signals from ombrotrophic peat was carried out originally using samples from open peat faces where the stratigraphic relationships could be easily observed. Now that such sections are rare and often degraded there is a need to demonstrate that data can be replicated from core profiles. Ten short cores taken from two adjacent bogs have been analysed for macrofossils and show a coherent series of changes, which are also similar to previous profiles from the same sites. It is concluded that variation between profiles is slight and less than observations of present vegetation mosaics might suggest. Recommendations for a standard approach to fieldwork on raised bogs that emphasises the utility of subfossil pool layers are proposed and the need for a secure chronology is stressed. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Quaternary Science Wiley

Replicability and variability of the recent macrofossil and proxy‐climate record from raised bogs: field stratigraphy and macrofossil data from Bolton Fell Moss and Walton Moss, Cumbria, England

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0267-8179
eISSN
1099-1417
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1099-1417(1998110)13:6<515::AID-JQS393>3.0.CO;2-S
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Replication of results is a basic tenet of science, but in palaeoecology this is very time‐consuming and the ‘signal’ is subject to ‘noise’. The derivation of proxy‐climate signals from ombrotrophic peat was carried out originally using samples from open peat faces where the stratigraphic relationships could be easily observed. Now that such sections are rare and often degraded there is a need to demonstrate that data can be replicated from core profiles. Ten short cores taken from two adjacent bogs have been analysed for macrofossils and show a coherent series of changes, which are also similar to previous profiles from the same sites. It is concluded that variation between profiles is slight and less than observations of present vegetation mosaics might suggest. Recommendations for a standard approach to fieldwork on raised bogs that emphasises the utility of subfossil pool layers are proposed and the need for a secure chronology is stressed. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Journal of Quaternary ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1998

References

  • Patterned fen development in northern Scotland: hypothesis testing and comparison with ombrotrophic blanket peats
    Charman, Charman
  • Late Holocene vegetational history, human impact and pollen representativity variations in northern Cumbria, England
    Dumayne‐Peaty, Dumayne‐Peaty; Barber, Barber
  • Dating raised bogs: new aspects of AMS 14 C wiggle matching, a reservoir effect and climatic change
    Kilian, Kilian; Van Der Plicht, Van Der Plicht; Van Geel, Van Geel
  • Bog development and environmental conditions as shown by the stratigraphy of Store Mosse mire in southern Sweden
    Svensson, Svensson

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