Relationships of working conditions, health problems and vehicle accidents in bus rapid transit (BRT) drivers

Relationships of working conditions, health problems and vehicle accidents in bus rapid transit... INTRODUCTIONBus rapid transit (BRT) systems (eg, the Transmilenio system in Bogota) are a growing means of transportation globally. Empirical evidence gathered over the past 50 years indicates that, compared to other occupational groups, commercial or professional drivers, in general, have a greater risk of suffering chronic cardiovascular, musculo‐skeletal, and gastrointestinal diseases, obesity, and hypertension, as well as mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and post‐traumatic stress disorder due to traffic accidents and working conditions. Futhermore, considering the strong similarity between working conditions of BRT drivers and other groups of commercial drivers (eg, city and intercity bus drivers, and cargo carrier drivers), it is possible that BRT drivers, like commercial drivers, face risk factors for accidents such as monotonous conditions, bad roads, consumption of CNS stimulants, age as well as work stressors such as time pressures, time‐binding, shift‐work, high physical and mental demands, and job strain.BRT drivers in Bogotá drive in somewhat different conditions than other urban bus drivers (eg, they have an exclusive bus lane and they don't receive money from the passengers), so one would expect for their conditions to be more favorable. On the other hand, they are often exposed to other sources of psychosocial stress http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Industrial Medicine Wiley

Relationships of working conditions, health problems and vehicle accidents in bus rapid transit (BRT) drivers

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0271-3586
eISSN
1097-0274
D.O.I.
10.1002/ajim.22821
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONBus rapid transit (BRT) systems (eg, the Transmilenio system in Bogota) are a growing means of transportation globally. Empirical evidence gathered over the past 50 years indicates that, compared to other occupational groups, commercial or professional drivers, in general, have a greater risk of suffering chronic cardiovascular, musculo‐skeletal, and gastrointestinal diseases, obesity, and hypertension, as well as mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and post‐traumatic stress disorder due to traffic accidents and working conditions. Futhermore, considering the strong similarity between working conditions of BRT drivers and other groups of commercial drivers (eg, city and intercity bus drivers, and cargo carrier drivers), it is possible that BRT drivers, like commercial drivers, face risk factors for accidents such as monotonous conditions, bad roads, consumption of CNS stimulants, age as well as work stressors such as time pressures, time‐binding, shift‐work, high physical and mental demands, and job strain.BRT drivers in Bogotá drive in somewhat different conditions than other urban bus drivers (eg, they have an exclusive bus lane and they don't receive money from the passengers), so one would expect for their conditions to be more favorable. On the other hand, they are often exposed to other sources of psychosocial stress

Journal

American Journal of Industrial MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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