Relationship between condition score, physical measurements and body fat percentage in mares

Relationship between condition score, physical measurements and body fat percentage in mares Short Communications Relationship between condition score, physical measurements and body fat percentage in mares D. R. HENNEKE, G. D. POlTER, J. L. KREIDER and B. F. YEATES Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Horse Section, Department of Animal Science, Texas A 8 M University, College Station, Texas, USA Introduction DIETARY energy intake has a marked effect on ovarian function in a number of species (Hafez and Jainudeen 1974). Body condition, ie, the amount of stored fat in an animal’s body, is positively related to reproductive performance in cattle (Donaldson 1969; Lamond 1969; Whitman 1975; Croxton and Stollard 1976; Dunn and Kaltenbach 1980) and sheep (Polliott and Kilkenny 1976). These studies have shown that improving the body condition of cows and ewes at mating significantly increased pregnancy rates, reduced the interval between parturitions and increased ovarian activity. Recently, Frisch (1980) reported evidence that mammals may require a minimum level of body fat for adequate reproductive performance. Research into the relationship between body condition and reproduction in the equine is vague and often misconstrued. Recent studies have shown that mares entering the breeding season or foaling in low body condition had prolonged post partum intervals, reduced conception rates and required more cycles http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Equine Veterinary Journal Wiley

Relationship between condition score, physical measurements and body fat percentage in mares

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1983 EVJ Ltd
ISSN
0425-1644
eISSN
2042-3306
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.2042-3306.1983.tb01826.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short Communications Relationship between condition score, physical measurements and body fat percentage in mares D. R. HENNEKE, G. D. POlTER, J. L. KREIDER and B. F. YEATES Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Horse Section, Department of Animal Science, Texas A 8 M University, College Station, Texas, USA Introduction DIETARY energy intake has a marked effect on ovarian function in a number of species (Hafez and Jainudeen 1974). Body condition, ie, the amount of stored fat in an animal’s body, is positively related to reproductive performance in cattle (Donaldson 1969; Lamond 1969; Whitman 1975; Croxton and Stollard 1976; Dunn and Kaltenbach 1980) and sheep (Polliott and Kilkenny 1976). These studies have shown that improving the body condition of cows and ewes at mating significantly increased pregnancy rates, reduced the interval between parturitions and increased ovarian activity. Recently, Frisch (1980) reported evidence that mammals may require a minimum level of body fat for adequate reproductive performance. Research into the relationship between body condition and reproduction in the equine is vague and often misconstrued. Recent studies have shown that mares entering the breeding season or foaling in low body condition had prolonged post partum intervals, reduced conception rates and required more cycles

Journal

Equine Veterinary JournalWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1983

References

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