Reductive Alkaline Release of N‐Glycans Generates a Variety of Unexpected, Useful Products

Reductive Alkaline Release of N‐Glycans Generates a Variety of Unexpected, Useful Products Release of O‐glycans by reductive β‐elimination has become routine in many glyco‐analytical laboratories and concomitant release of N‐glycans has repeatedly been observed. Revisiting this somewhat forgotten mode of N‐glycan release revealed that all kinds of N‐glycans including oligomannosidic and complex‐type N‐glycans from plants with 3‐linked fucose and from mammals with or without 6‐linked fucose and with sialic acid could be recovered. However, the mass spectra of the obtained products revealed very surprising facts. Even after 16 h incubation in 1 M sodium borohydride, a large part of the glycans occurred in reducing form. Moreover, about one third emerged in the form of the stable amino‐functionalized 1‐amino‐1‐deoxy‐glycitol. When avoiding acidic conditions, considerable amounts of glycosylamine were observed. In addition, a compound with a reduced asparagine and de‐N‐acetylation products, in particular of sialylated glycans, was seen. The relative yields of the products reducing glycosylamine, reducing N‐glycan, 1‐amino‐1‐deoxy‐glycitol or glycitol could be controlled by the release conditions, foremost by temperature and borohydride concentration. Thus, chemical release of N‐glycans constitutes a cost‐saving alternative to enzymatic hydrolysis for the preparation of precursors for the production of reference compounds for various formats of N‐glycan analysis. Moreover, it allows to obtain a stable amino‐functionalized glycan derivative, which can be employed to construct glycan arrays or affinity matrices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proteomics Wiley

Reductive Alkaline Release of N‐Glycans Generates a Variety of Unexpected, Useful Products

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
1615-9853
eISSN
1615-9861
D.O.I.
10.1002/pmic.201700330
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Release of O‐glycans by reductive β‐elimination has become routine in many glyco‐analytical laboratories and concomitant release of N‐glycans has repeatedly been observed. Revisiting this somewhat forgotten mode of N‐glycan release revealed that all kinds of N‐glycans including oligomannosidic and complex‐type N‐glycans from plants with 3‐linked fucose and from mammals with or without 6‐linked fucose and with sialic acid could be recovered. However, the mass spectra of the obtained products revealed very surprising facts. Even after 16 h incubation in 1 M sodium borohydride, a large part of the glycans occurred in reducing form. Moreover, about one third emerged in the form of the stable amino‐functionalized 1‐amino‐1‐deoxy‐glycitol. When avoiding acidic conditions, considerable amounts of glycosylamine were observed. In addition, a compound with a reduced asparagine and de‐N‐acetylation products, in particular of sialylated glycans, was seen. The relative yields of the products reducing glycosylamine, reducing N‐glycan, 1‐amino‐1‐deoxy‐glycitol or glycitol could be controlled by the release conditions, foremost by temperature and borohydride concentration. Thus, chemical release of N‐glycans constitutes a cost‐saving alternative to enzymatic hydrolysis for the preparation of precursors for the production of reference compounds for various formats of N‐glycan analysis. Moreover, it allows to obtain a stable amino‐functionalized glycan derivative, which can be employed to construct glycan arrays or affinity matrices.

Journal

ProteomicsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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