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Reducing Dissolved Phosphorus in Stream Water May Not Influence Estimation of Sediment Equilibrium Phosphorus Concentrations

Reducing Dissolved Phosphorus in Stream Water May Not Influence Estimation of Sediment... AbbreviationsEPCequilibrium phosphorus concentrationSRPsoluble reactive phosphorusWWTPwastewater treatment plantPhosphorus enrichment in streams and rivers often leads to excessive algal growth and accelerated eutrophication. In addition to P inputs from the landscape, in‐stream P behavior must be considered to apply effective management strategies (McDowell and Sharpley, 2003). Benthic sediments can adsorb or release P through physiochemical processes (e.g., sorption and desorption with Al and Fe hydroxides or coprecipitation with Ca) and biological processes (e.g., assimilation by bacteria, aquatic plants, and benthic algae) (Withers and Jarvie, 2008). These in‐stream processes can modify edge‐of‐field P losses and P loads and forms transported downstream (Mulholland and Webster, 2010).In theory, the potential for sediments to adsorb or release P depends on the equilibrium P concentration (EPC), which is the water column P concentration where P is neither sorbed nor released from the sediments (Froelich, 1988). This potential for sediments to either buffer or increase external P loads is increasingly important for watershed modeling and total maximum daily load development (Mittelstet et al., 2017; White et al., 2014). For the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, a widely used model for predicting hydrology, water quality, and management impacts (Gassman et al., 2007), an in‐stream P cycling model has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Reducing Dissolved Phosphorus in Stream Water May Not Influence Estimation of Sediment Equilibrium Phosphorus Concentrations

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.05.0037
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsEPCequilibrium phosphorus concentrationSRPsoluble reactive phosphorusWWTPwastewater treatment plantPhosphorus enrichment in streams and rivers often leads to excessive algal growth and accelerated eutrophication. In addition to P inputs from the landscape, in‐stream P behavior must be considered to apply effective management strategies (McDowell and Sharpley, 2003). Benthic sediments can adsorb or release P through physiochemical processes (e.g., sorption and desorption with Al and Fe hydroxides or coprecipitation with Ca) and biological processes (e.g., assimilation by bacteria, aquatic plants, and benthic algae) (Withers and Jarvie, 2008). These in‐stream processes can modify edge‐of‐field P losses and P loads and forms transported downstream (Mulholland and Webster, 2010).In theory, the potential for sediments to adsorb or release P depends on the equilibrium P concentration (EPC), which is the water column P concentration where P is neither sorbed nor released from the sediments (Froelich, 1988). This potential for sediments to either buffer or increase external P loads is increasingly important for watershed modeling and total maximum daily load development (Mittelstet et al., 2017; White et al., 2014). For the Soil and Water Assessment Tool, a widely used model for predicting hydrology, water quality, and management impacts (Gassman et al., 2007), an in‐stream P cycling model has

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References