Recovery of Brightness Discrimination in Adult Rats despite Progressive Loss of Retrogradely Labelled Retinal Ganglion Cells after Controlled Optic Nerve Crush

Recovery of Brightness Discrimination in Adult Rats despite Progressive Loss of Retrogradely... Restoration of brightness discrimination was studied in adult rats after controlled crush of the optic nerve in order to further characterize a recently introduced experimental brain injury model. Mild, moderate or severe crush of the optic nerve produced partial or complete loss of the ability to perform a brightness discrimination task. Two to three weeks following mild injury we observed nearly complete spontaneous behavioural recovery whereas recovery was more limited after moderate and totally absent after severe crush. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injected into the superior colliculus was transported retrogradely across the lesion site and accumulated in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Two days following mild, moderate or severe crush, 28, 23 and 8% respectively of RGCs were found to be labelled with HRP, indicating that they are still connected with their target and are therefore presumably intact. RGC loss affected all areas of the retina homogeneously. At postoperative day 14, the number of morphologically‘intact’RGCs declined even further to 11% in the mild injury group, despite our observation of recovery of vision to near‐normal levels. The mechanism whereby such impressive neuronal plasticity is achieved despite the rather small number of intact RGCs is still unknown. However, further studies of the crush model using additional behavioural, morphological and electrophysiological techniques may allow us to determine more clearly the biological basis of recovery of function after central nervous system injury. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Neuroscience Wiley

Recovery of Brightness Discrimination in Adult Rats despite Progressive Loss of Retrogradely Labelled Retinal Ganglion Cells after Controlled Optic Nerve Crush

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0953-816X
eISSN
1460-9568
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1460-9568.1993.tb00533.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Restoration of brightness discrimination was studied in adult rats after controlled crush of the optic nerve in order to further characterize a recently introduced experimental brain injury model. Mild, moderate or severe crush of the optic nerve produced partial or complete loss of the ability to perform a brightness discrimination task. Two to three weeks following mild injury we observed nearly complete spontaneous behavioural recovery whereas recovery was more limited after moderate and totally absent after severe crush. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injected into the superior colliculus was transported retrogradely across the lesion site and accumulated in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Two days following mild, moderate or severe crush, 28, 23 and 8% respectively of RGCs were found to be labelled with HRP, indicating that they are still connected with their target and are therefore presumably intact. RGC loss affected all areas of the retina homogeneously. At postoperative day 14, the number of morphologically‘intact’RGCs declined even further to 11% in the mild injury group, despite our observation of recovery of vision to near‐normal levels. The mechanism whereby such impressive neuronal plasticity is achieved despite the rather small number of intact RGCs is still unknown. However, further studies of the crush model using additional behavioural, morphological and electrophysiological techniques may allow us to determine more clearly the biological basis of recovery of function after central nervous system injury.

Journal

European Journal of NeuroscienceWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1993

References

  • Diffuse axonal injury due to nonmissile head injury in humans: an analysis of 45 cases
    Adams, Adams; Graham, Graham; Murray, Murray; Scott, Scott
  • Long survival of retinal ganglion cells in the cat after selective crush of the optic nerve
    Cottee, Cottee; FitzGibbon, FitzGibbon; Westland, Westland; Burke, Burke
  • Different effects of intracranial and intraorbital section of the optic nerve on the functional responses of rat retinal ganglion cells
    Domenici, Domenici; Gravina, Gravina; Berardi, Berardi; Maffei, Maffei
  • The mechanism of vision: VII. The projection of the retina upon the primary optic centers in the rat
    Lashley, Lashley
  • Alterations in the morphology of ganglion cell dendrites in the adult rat retina after optic nerve transection and grafting of peripheral nerve segments
    Thanos, Thanos

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