Rebamipide alleviates radiation‐induced colitis through improvement of goblet cell differentiation in mice

Rebamipide alleviates radiation‐induced colitis through improvement of goblet cell... IntroductionRadiotherapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation cause severe damage to healthy tissue. The gastrointestinal tract is a radiation‐sensitive organ, and gastrointestinal complications of radiation are collectively referred to as gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome (GI‐ARS). GI‐ARS can cause a clinical problem, called acute radiation enteritis, which involves inflammation, edema, epithelial barrier impairment, ulceration, a decrease in mitotic activity, and crypt defects in the gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial translocation is defined as the passage of viable endogenous bacteria and endotoxins from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites such as the mesenteric lymph node (mLN) complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and bloodstream. Endotoxemia and bacteremia are critical events in the pathogenesis of GI‐ARS, and the colon is the primary source of endotoxins, which thus highlights the importance of this tissue's injury during radiation exposure.Goblet cells are columnar epithelial cells specializing in the secretion of high‐molecular‐weight glycoproteins, called mucins, which consist of a protein core, rich in threonine, proline, or serine residues, supplemented with an O‐linked oligosaccharide. These cells play a pivotal role in epithelial defense against luminal stimulants and pathogens. Mucin 2 (MUC2), synthesized by goblet cells, is the predominant structural component of the intestinal mucus layer that functions as a barrier to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Wiley

Rebamipide alleviates radiation‐induced colitis through improvement of goblet cell differentiation in mice

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
0815-9319
eISSN
1440-1746
D.O.I.
10.1111/jgh.14021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionRadiotherapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation cause severe damage to healthy tissue. The gastrointestinal tract is a radiation‐sensitive organ, and gastrointestinal complications of radiation are collectively referred to as gastrointestinal acute radiation syndrome (GI‐ARS). GI‐ARS can cause a clinical problem, called acute radiation enteritis, which involves inflammation, edema, epithelial barrier impairment, ulceration, a decrease in mitotic activity, and crypt defects in the gastrointestinal tract. Bacterial translocation is defined as the passage of viable endogenous bacteria and endotoxins from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites such as the mesenteric lymph node (mLN) complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and bloodstream. Endotoxemia and bacteremia are critical events in the pathogenesis of GI‐ARS, and the colon is the primary source of endotoxins, which thus highlights the importance of this tissue's injury during radiation exposure.Goblet cells are columnar epithelial cells specializing in the secretion of high‐molecular‐weight glycoproteins, called mucins, which consist of a protein core, rich in threonine, proline, or serine residues, supplemented with an O‐linked oligosaccharide. These cells play a pivotal role in epithelial defense against luminal stimulants and pathogens. Mucin 2 (MUC2), synthesized by goblet cells, is the predominant structural component of the intestinal mucus layer that functions as a barrier to

Journal

Journal of Gastroenterology and HepatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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