Reading disability: “normative” or “pathological”

Reading disability: “normative” or “pathological” Reading disability or dyslexia involves an “unexpected” failure to read competently in children of normal intelligence. Whilst this has for many years been regarded as a developmental “disorder” it is debatable whether this view can be defended on the basis of the available evidence. Arguments for the normative versus the pathological view of reading disability encompassing population distribution, reading behaviour, correlates of reading failure and primary etiological factors arc presented in this paper. It is concluded that the normative view is the most heuristic and parsimonious on current evidence and has the potential advantages of demedicalising the problem and reducing the stigma for reading disabled children. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Psychology Wiley

Reading disability: “normative” or “pathological”

Australian Journal of Psychology, Volume 41 (2) – Aug 1, 1989

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1989 Australian Psychological Society
ISSN
0004-9530
eISSN
1742-9536
D.O.I.
10.1080/00049538908260079
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reading disability or dyslexia involves an “unexpected” failure to read competently in children of normal intelligence. Whilst this has for many years been regarded as a developmental “disorder” it is debatable whether this view can be defended on the basis of the available evidence. Arguments for the normative versus the pathological view of reading disability encompassing population distribution, reading behaviour, correlates of reading failure and primary etiological factors arc presented in this paper. It is concluded that the normative view is the most heuristic and parsimonious on current evidence and has the potential advantages of demedicalising the problem and reducing the stigma for reading disabled children.

Journal

Australian Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1989

References

  • Patterns of intellectual functioning in non‐retarded autistic and schizophrenic children
    Arsanow, Arsanow; Tanguay, Tanguay; Bott, Bott; Freeman, Freeman
  • Reading errors and self‐correction behaviour
    Clay, Clay
  • The development of reading: As you seek so shall you find
    Ellis, Ellis; Large, Large
  • Reading for meaning and reading for sound in autistic and dyslexic children
    Frith, Frith; Snowling, Snowling
  • Prediction of reading disability in twin boys
    Johnston, Johnston; Prior, Prior; Hay, Hay
  • Phonological coding in dyslexic readers
    Johnston, Johnston
  • Children with reading and spelling retardation: Functioning of whole word and correspondence rule mechanisms
    Jorm, Jorm
  • Phonological recoding and reading acquisition
    Jorm, Jorm; Share, Share
  • Neuropsychological approaches to the study of reading
    Patterson, Patterson
  • The identification and prevalence of specific reading retardation
    Rodgers, Rodgers
  • The concept of specific reading retardation
    Rutter, Rutter; Yule, Yule
  • Lexical decision and naming times of young disabled readers with function and content words
    Share, Share; Jorm, Jorm; Matthews, Matthews; Maclean, Maclean
  • Further evidence relating to the distinction between specific reading retardation and general reading backwardness
    Share, Share; McGee, McGee; McKenzie, McKenzie; Williams, Williams; Silva, Silva
  • Predictive value of speech and language screening
    Stevenson, Stevenson
  • A twin study of genetic influences on reading and spelling ability and disability
    Stevenson, Stevenson; Graham, Graham; Fredman, Fredman; McLaughlin, McLaughlin
  • A case study of developmental phonological dyslexia
    Temple, Temple; Marshall, Marshall
  • Reading retardation revisited
    Wissel, Wissel; Zegers, Zegers
  • Over‐and‐under‐achievement in reading: Distribution in the general population
    Yule, Yule; Rutter, Rutter; Berger, Berger; Thompson, Thompson

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