Rapid Rise in Transcription Factor mRNAs in Rat Brain After Electroshock‐Induced Seizures

Rapid Rise in Transcription Factor mRNAs in Rat Brain After Electroshock‐Induced Seizures Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that several transcription factor genes are rapidly activated by neuronal stimulation. For example, we have found that prolonged and repeated seizure activity produced by administration of chemical convulsants induces a rapid and transient increase in mRNA levels of four immediate early genes in rat brain. These genes, zif/268, c‐fos, c‐jun, andjun‐B, encode sequence specific DNA binding proteins thought to act as transcription regulatory factors. To ascertain whether a brief electrically induced seizure discharge of the type utilized in clinical electroconvulsive treatment is sufficient to induce a similar genomic response, we have examined the response of these mRNAs in rat brain following single and repeated electroshock‐induced seizures. After electroshock, mRNA levels of each of these genes increase within 15 min, and all except cjun return to near baseline levels within 4 h. Although this response is most prominent in granule cell neurons of the hippocampus, increases are also apparent in neocortex and pyriform cortex. The rapid mRNA response persists in animals receiving a chronic electroshock protocol similar to that used in clinical electroconvulsive therapy. Intrahippocampal infusion of the sodium channel antagonist tetrodotoxin blocks hippocampal mRNA responses without blocking seizures, indicating a role for electrical excitation in the electroshockinduced mRNA response. By contrast, pretreatment with anticonvulsants or selective NMDA antagonists, which reduce seizure intensity and block hindlimb extension, fails to alter mRNA responses, suggesting that seizure induction, rather than spread, is linked to these mRNA responses. Because electroshock induces robust, highly reproducible mRNA responses, it may be useful to study the neuronal genomic response to stimulation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurochemistry Wiley

Rapid Rise in Transcription Factor mRNAs in Rat Brain After Electroshock‐Induced Seizures

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3042
eISSN
1471-4159
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1471-4159.1990.tb05777.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that several transcription factor genes are rapidly activated by neuronal stimulation. For example, we have found that prolonged and repeated seizure activity produced by administration of chemical convulsants induces a rapid and transient increase in mRNA levels of four immediate early genes in rat brain. These genes, zif/268, c‐fos, c‐jun, andjun‐B, encode sequence specific DNA binding proteins thought to act as transcription regulatory factors. To ascertain whether a brief electrically induced seizure discharge of the type utilized in clinical electroconvulsive treatment is sufficient to induce a similar genomic response, we have examined the response of these mRNAs in rat brain following single and repeated electroshock‐induced seizures. After electroshock, mRNA levels of each of these genes increase within 15 min, and all except cjun return to near baseline levels within 4 h. Although this response is most prominent in granule cell neurons of the hippocampus, increases are also apparent in neocortex and pyriform cortex. The rapid mRNA response persists in animals receiving a chronic electroshock protocol similar to that used in clinical electroconvulsive therapy. Intrahippocampal infusion of the sodium channel antagonist tetrodotoxin blocks hippocampal mRNA responses without blocking seizures, indicating a role for electrical excitation in the electroshockinduced mRNA response. By contrast, pretreatment with anticonvulsants or selective NMDA antagonists, which reduce seizure intensity and block hindlimb extension, fails to alter mRNA responses, suggesting that seizure induction, rather than spread, is linked to these mRNA responses. Because electroshock induces robust, highly reproducible mRNA responses, it may be useful to study the neuronal genomic response to stimulation.

Journal

Journal of NeurochemistryWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1990

References

  • Mouse brain c‐fos mRNA distribution following a single electroconvulsive shock
    Daval, Daval; Nakajima, Nakajima; Gleiter, Gleiter; Post, Post; Marangos, Marangos
  • A comparison between the in vivo and in vitro activity of five potent and competitive NMDA antagonists
    Lodge, Lodge; Davies, Davies; Jones, Jones; Millar, Millar; Manallack, Manallack; Ornstein, Ornstein; Verberne, Verberne; Young, Young; Beart, Beart
  • Glutamate receptor agonists increase the expression of Fos, Fra, and AP‐1 DNA binding activity in the mammalian brain
    Sonnenberg, Sonnenberg; Mitchelmore, Mitchelmore; Macgregor‐Leon, Macgregor‐Leon; Hempstead, Hempstead; Morgan, Morgan; Curran, Curran

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