RAINFOREST EMPIRICISM AND QUASI‘‐RATIONALITY: TWO APPROACHES TO OBJECTIVE BIODATA

RAINFOREST EMPIRICISM AND QUASI‘‐RATIONALITY: TWO APPROACHES TO OBJECTIVE BIODATA Two approaches to objective biodata, designed to achieve the interpretability and stability of rational approaches, yet minimize socially desirable responding, were explored. The first was a quasi‐rational attempt to derive biodata analogs to an existing temperament measure, and then use them as rational scales. The second was a theory‐based variant of criterion‐referenced keying, termed rainforest empiricism. Both were utilized with two consecutive classes of U.S. Military Academy cadets (n= 2,565) to predict leadership performance over four rating periods. The biodata analogs to the temperament measure added incremental validity over the Academy's current admissions package and had significantly smaller correlations with a social desirability scale than their equivalent temperament scales. Scales developed with the rainforest approach had higher incremental validities and lower social desirability. Both methods demonstrated satisfactory stability upon cross‐validation, and provided complementary interpretability. Advantages to each approach, and the implications for their use, are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

RAINFOREST EMPIRICISM AND QUASI‘‐RATIONALITY: TWO APPROACHES TO OBJECTIVE BIODATA

Personnel Psychology, Volume 46 (4) – Dec 1, 1993

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1993.tb01566.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two approaches to objective biodata, designed to achieve the interpretability and stability of rational approaches, yet minimize socially desirable responding, were explored. The first was a quasi‐rational attempt to derive biodata analogs to an existing temperament measure, and then use them as rational scales. The second was a theory‐based variant of criterion‐referenced keying, termed rainforest empiricism. Both were utilized with two consecutive classes of U.S. Military Academy cadets (n= 2,565) to predict leadership performance over four rating periods. The biodata analogs to the temperament measure added incremental validity over the Academy's current admissions package and had significantly smaller correlations with a social desirability scale than their equivalent temperament scales. Scales developed with the rainforest approach had higher incremental validities and lower social desirability. Both methods demonstrated satisfactory stability upon cross‐validation, and provided complementary interpretability. Advantages to each approach, and the implications for their use, are discussed.

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1993

References

  • Potential versus actual faking of a biodata form: An analysis along several dimensions of item type
    Becker, Becker; Colquitt, Colquitt
  • A conceptual rationale for the domain and attributes of biodata items
    Mael, Mael

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