Radiation therapy in retroperitoneal sarcoma management

Radiation therapy in retroperitoneal sarcoma management INTRODUCTIONThe potential curative role of surgery for primary non‐metastatic retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS), is incontrovertible. However, the evidence for the addition of radiotherapy (RT) to radical surgery, as has been established for sarcomas arising in the extremities, is currently lacking and the results of the EORTC‐STBSG 62092‐22092 (NCT01344018) study addressing this question are eagerly awaited. Therefore, close collaboration and discussion between surgeons and radiation oncologists is important as the objective is to optimally combine these two treatment modalities. To date, the use of RT for the treatment of RPS is highly variable. In a population based study on 2348 RPS cases, Porter et al reported in 2006 that in general practice outside the setting of clinical trials only 25.9% of patients received RT and of these 85.5% were treated postoperatively (PORT). In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, published in 2015, 30% received RT and all of them PORT. In the multi‐institutional series published by Gronchi et al in 2016, 32% of 1007 patients received any form of RT, but interestingly 72% of them were treated preoperatively. Although variable, there seems to be a time‐shift towards more preoperative RT in recent years.Given the rarity of sarcoma and complexity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Surgical Oncology Wiley

Radiation therapy in retroperitoneal sarcoma management

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0022-4790
eISSN
1096-9098
D.O.I.
10.1002/jso.24892
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe potential curative role of surgery for primary non‐metastatic retroperitoneal sarcomas (RPS), is incontrovertible. However, the evidence for the addition of radiotherapy (RT) to radical surgery, as has been established for sarcomas arising in the extremities, is currently lacking and the results of the EORTC‐STBSG 62092‐22092 (NCT01344018) study addressing this question are eagerly awaited. Therefore, close collaboration and discussion between surgeons and radiation oncologists is important as the objective is to optimally combine these two treatment modalities. To date, the use of RT for the treatment of RPS is highly variable. In a population based study on 2348 RPS cases, Porter et al reported in 2006 that in general practice outside the setting of clinical trials only 25.9% of patients received RT and of these 85.5% were treated postoperatively (PORT). In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, published in 2015, 30% received RT and all of them PORT. In the multi‐institutional series published by Gronchi et al in 2016, 32% of 1007 patients received any form of RT, but interestingly 72% of them were treated preoperatively. Although variable, there seems to be a time‐shift towards more preoperative RT in recent years.Given the rarity of sarcoma and complexity

Journal

Journal of Surgical OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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