QALY‐maximisation and public preferences: results from a general population survey

QALY‐maximisation and public preferences: results from a general population survey The appropriate criteria that should be used in setting priorities in a publicly funded health care system remain open to debate. From a health economics perspective, quality‐adjusted life years (QALYs) are increasingly portrayed as a measure of societal value and the criterion of QALY maximisation is then advocated. This paper reports a study that investigated the extent to which some of the assumptions underlying the QALY maximisation approach, notably constant marginal societal value for increases in the size of health programmes, the level of risk, and the level of benefit are supported by members of the public. A general population interview‐based survey was conducted. The survey design employed conjoint methods. In general, the public preference data from this study, in themselves, are not much at odds with the core proportionality assumptions concerning societal value in the QALY maximisation model assumptions. The data are, however, at odds with reports from various previous studies. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Economics Wiley

QALY‐maximisation and public preferences: results from a general population survey

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1057-9230
eISSN
1099-1050
D.O.I.
10.1002/hec.695
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The appropriate criteria that should be used in setting priorities in a publicly funded health care system remain open to debate. From a health economics perspective, quality‐adjusted life years (QALYs) are increasingly portrayed as a measure of societal value and the criterion of QALY maximisation is then advocated. This paper reports a study that investigated the extent to which some of the assumptions underlying the QALY maximisation approach, notably constant marginal societal value for increases in the size of health programmes, the level of risk, and the level of benefit are supported by members of the public. A general population interview‐based survey was conducted. The survey design employed conjoint methods. In general, the public preference data from this study, in themselves, are not much at odds with the core proportionality assumptions concerning societal value in the QALY maximisation model assumptions. The data are, however, at odds with reports from various previous studies. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Health EconomicsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2002

References

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