Pulsed Radiofrequency in Lumbar Radicular Pain: Clinical Effects in Various Etiological Groups

Pulsed Radiofrequency in Lumbar Radicular Pain: Clinical Effects in Various Etiological Groups Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) applied to the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: A retrospective analysis of 54 consecutive patients who underwent 75 PRF procedures was performed. The patients were divided into three groups according to the etiology of the lesion (herniated disc (HD), spinal stenosis (SS), and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)). The analgesic efficacy of the technique was assessed using a 10‐point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at baseline and, along with the Global Perceived Effect (GPE), at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days. The reduction in medications and the number of complications associated with the technique were assessed. Results: A decrease in the NRS score was observed in patients with HD (P < 0.05) and SS (P < 0.001), but not in those with FBSS. The GPE scores confirmed this finding. No complications were noted. Conclusions: We observed that PRF of the DRG was significantly more efficacious in HD and SS than in FBSS patients. The application of PRF was not effective in FBSS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pain Practice Wiley

Pulsed Radiofrequency in Lumbar Radicular Pain: Clinical Effects in Various Etiological Groups

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1530-7085
eISSN
1533-2500
DOI
10.1111/j.1533-2500.2007.00105.x
pmid
17305674
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) applied to the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: A retrospective analysis of 54 consecutive patients who underwent 75 PRF procedures was performed. The patients were divided into three groups according to the etiology of the lesion (herniated disc (HD), spinal stenosis (SS), and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)). The analgesic efficacy of the technique was assessed using a 10‐point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at baseline and, along with the Global Perceived Effect (GPE), at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days. The reduction in medications and the number of complications associated with the technique were assessed. Results: A decrease in the NRS score was observed in patients with HD (P < 0.05) and SS (P < 0.001), but not in those with FBSS. The GPE scores confirmed this finding. No complications were noted. Conclusions: We observed that PRF of the DRG was significantly more efficacious in HD and SS than in FBSS patients. The application of PRF was not effective in FBSS.

Journal

Pain PracticeWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2007

References

  • Is pulsed radiofrequency a neuromodulation technique?
    Abejón, Abejón; Reig, Reig
  • Percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the cervical dorsal root ganglion in the treatment of chronic cervical pain syndromes: a clinical audit
    Van Zundert, Van Zundert; De Lame, De Lame; Louw, Louw
  • Spinal cord stimulation for failed back surgery syndrome: technical advances, patient selection and outcome
    Noth, Noth; Guarino, Guarino
  • The effect of nerve‐root injections on the need for operative treatment of lumbar radicular pain: a prospective, randomized, controlled, double‐blind study
    Riew, Riew; Yin, Yin; Gilula, Gilula
  • Periradicular infiltration for sciatica: a randomized controlled trial
    Karppinen, Karppinen; Malmivaara, Malmivaara; Kurunlahti, Kurunlahti

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