Pulse pressure correlates poorly with basilar artery diameter in community‐dwelling older adults: The Atahualpa Project

Pulse pressure correlates poorly with basilar artery diameter in community‐dwelling older... Dear Editor,The pathogenesis of intracranial arterial dolichoectasia is controversial. The fact that dolichoectasia and atherosclerosis share risk factors has led us to consider a common underlying pathophysiology for both conditions. Furthermore, atheromatous changes have been found in a sizable proportion of intracranial ectatic arteries. Nevertheless, increasing evidence suggests that dolichoectasia differs from atherosclerosis because it predominantly affects the internal elastic lamina, as opposed to the endothelial injury and plaque formation characteristics of atherosclerosis. This is supported by studies showing a lack of association between extracranial atherosclerosis and intracranial dolichoectasia. However, the relevance of intracranial atherosclerosis in patients with dolichoectasia has not been investigated at the population level.We documented a relationship between pulse pressure (PP) levels and intracranial atherosclerosis in older Amerindians living in rural Ecuador. This might be related to the exposure of major intracranial vessels to the stretch caused by increases in pulsatile components of blood pressure that, in turn, enhance arterial stiffness and lead to atherosclerotic abnormalities. As posterior circulation is most often involved in individuals with intracranial dolichoectasia, we evaluated the correlation between the PP and the basilar artery (BA) diameter to assess the role of this reliable biomarker of intracranial atherosclerosis in the pathogenesis of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geriatrics & Gerontology International Wiley

Pulse pressure correlates poorly with basilar artery diameter in community‐dwelling older adults: The Atahualpa Project

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society
ISSN
1444-1586
eISSN
1447-0594
D.O.I.
10.1111/ggi.13223
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dear Editor,The pathogenesis of intracranial arterial dolichoectasia is controversial. The fact that dolichoectasia and atherosclerosis share risk factors has led us to consider a common underlying pathophysiology for both conditions. Furthermore, atheromatous changes have been found in a sizable proportion of intracranial ectatic arteries. Nevertheless, increasing evidence suggests that dolichoectasia differs from atherosclerosis because it predominantly affects the internal elastic lamina, as opposed to the endothelial injury and plaque formation characteristics of atherosclerosis. This is supported by studies showing a lack of association between extracranial atherosclerosis and intracranial dolichoectasia. However, the relevance of intracranial atherosclerosis in patients with dolichoectasia has not been investigated at the population level.We documented a relationship between pulse pressure (PP) levels and intracranial atherosclerosis in older Amerindians living in rural Ecuador. This might be related to the exposure of major intracranial vessels to the stretch caused by increases in pulsatile components of blood pressure that, in turn, enhance arterial stiffness and lead to atherosclerotic abnormalities. As posterior circulation is most often involved in individuals with intracranial dolichoectasia, we evaluated the correlation between the PP and the basilar artery (BA) diameter to assess the role of this reliable biomarker of intracranial atherosclerosis in the pathogenesis of

Journal

Geriatrics & Gerontology InternationalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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