Public–Private Collaboration in Health and Human Service Delivery: Evidence from Community Partnerships

Public–Private Collaboration in Health and Human Service Delivery: Evidence from Community... The collaboration among public–private partnerships that applied to the Community Care Network (CCN) demonstration program of the Hospital Research and Educational Trust is examined. These partnerships link broad‐based community coalitions with health and human service providers in efforts to improve community health and local service delivery. Although they willingly collaborated in identifying community health needs, coordinating services, and reporting to the community, partnership participants showed less alacrity in joining forces to reduce redundancy and increase efficiency. Such patterns suggest that organizations might best profit from working together on activities that maintain existing power relations and that have the potential to add prestige and attract new clients. Collaboration in these areas may be essential to building a foundation of trust that leads to future cooperation in more sensitive areas. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Milbank Quarterly Wiley

Public–Private Collaboration in Health and Human Service Delivery: Evidence from Community Partnerships

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Abstract

The collaboration among public–private partnerships that applied to the Community Care Network (CCN) demonstration program of the Hospital Research and Educational Trust is examined. These partnerships link broad‐based community coalitions with health and human service providers in efforts to improve community health and local service delivery. Although they willingly collaborated in identifying community health needs, coordinating services, and reporting to the community, partnership participants showed less alacrity in joining forces to reduce redundancy and increase efficiency. Such patterns suggest that organizations might best profit from working together on activities that maintain existing power relations and that have the potential to add prestige and attract new clients. Collaboration in these areas may be essential to building a foundation of trust that leads to future cooperation in more sensitive areas.

Journal

The Milbank QuarterlyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1997

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