Psychotic depression: How to diagnose this often undetected — and hidden — condition

Psychotic depression: How to diagnose this often undetected — and hidden — condition Major depressive disorder with psychotic features, commonly referred to as psychotic depression, is a diagnosis that often goes undetected in children, adolescents, and adults alike. One of the most challenging aspects of this disorder is that the patient's delusional pattern of thinking can be subtle in nature, increasing the likelihood that the underlying psychotic component to their presentation will be overlooked by even the most skilled clinicians. Moreover, studies have shown that once patients have been successfully treated for an episode of psychotic depression, they often reflect back to their illness and express having felt reluctance to reveal the extent of the paranoia and delusions they were experiencing due to fear of being labeled as “crazy,” adding an additional degree of difficulty in diagnosing and, ultimately, treating that patient. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter Wiley

Psychotic depression: How to diagnose this often undetected — and hidden — condition

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1058-1073
eISSN
1556-7575
D.O.I.
10.1002/cbl.30284
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Major depressive disorder with psychotic features, commonly referred to as psychotic depression, is a diagnosis that often goes undetected in children, adolescents, and adults alike. One of the most challenging aspects of this disorder is that the patient's delusional pattern of thinking can be subtle in nature, increasing the likelihood that the underlying psychotic component to their presentation will be overlooked by even the most skilled clinicians. Moreover, studies have shown that once patients have been successfully treated for an episode of psychotic depression, they often reflect back to their illness and express having felt reluctance to reveal the extent of the paranoia and delusions they were experiencing due to fear of being labeled as “crazy,” adding an additional degree of difficulty in diagnosing and, ultimately, treating that patient.

Journal

The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior LetterWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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