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Psychological Well‐being: Evidence Regarding its Causes and Consequences †

Psychological Well‐being: Evidence Regarding its Causes and Consequences † This review focuses on positive aspects of well‐being, or flourishing. It examines evidence for the causes of positive well‐being and also its consequences, including beneficial effects for many aspects of cognitive functioning, health, and social relationships. The neurobiological basis of psychological well‐being is examined, and recent data on brain activation and neurochemical pathways are presented. Individuals vary widely in their habitual level of psychological well‐being, and there is evidence for a seminal role of social factors and the early environment in this process. It is often assumed that the drivers of well‐being are the same as (but in the opposite direction to) the drivers of ill‐being, but while this is true for some drivers, others have more selective effects. Future developments in the science of well‐being and its application require a fresh approach—beyond targeting the alleviation of disorder to a focus on personal and interpersonal flourishing. A universal intervention approach is outlined which may both increase population flourishing and reduce common mental health problems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being Wiley

Psychological Well‐being: Evidence Regarding its Causes and Consequences †

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References (162)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2009 The Author. Journal compilation © 2009 International Association of Applied Psychology
ISSN
1758-0846
eISSN
1758-0854
DOI
10.1111/j.1758-0854.2009.01008.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This review focuses on positive aspects of well‐being, or flourishing. It examines evidence for the causes of positive well‐being and also its consequences, including beneficial effects for many aspects of cognitive functioning, health, and social relationships. The neurobiological basis of psychological well‐being is examined, and recent data on brain activation and neurochemical pathways are presented. Individuals vary widely in their habitual level of psychological well‐being, and there is evidence for a seminal role of social factors and the early environment in this process. It is often assumed that the drivers of well‐being are the same as (but in the opposite direction to) the drivers of ill‐being, but while this is true for some drivers, others have more selective effects. Future developments in the science of well‐being and its application require a fresh approach—beyond targeting the alleviation of disorder to a focus on personal and interpersonal flourishing. A universal intervention approach is outlined which may both increase population flourishing and reduce common mental health problems.

Journal

Applied Psychology: Health and Well-BeingWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2009

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