Psychological correlates of fear of falling: Findings from the German Aging Survey

Psychological correlates of fear of falling: Findings from the German Aging Survey IntroductionMore than 30% of community‐dwelling older individuals experience a fall each year. Therefore, and regardless of the physical consequences, some individuals develop a fear of falling (FOF). FOF is also common in older adults who have not yet experienced a fall. As FOF is strongly related to age, it is expected that the number of individuals with FOF will increase markedly as a result of demographic shifts. FOF ultimately results in social isolation, avoidance of physical activities, loss of self‐confidence, decreases in mental health and worse quality of life. Furthermore, it is associated with admissions to a nursing home and overestimation of physical capabilities. A schematic diagram of how FOF can affect balance performance was recently introduced elsewhere. Hence, it is important to know the factors associated with FOF.To date, various studies have examined the association of sociodemographic factors, functional outcomes and mental health with FOF. However, only a small body of literature has examined the psychological correlates of FOF. These studies are mostly restricted to psychological correlates that are directly related to FOF. Very few studies have found associations between FOF and general psychological factors, such as general self‐efficacy or optimism, suggesting that these general psychological correlates should http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geriatrics & Gerontology International Wiley

Psychological correlates of fear of falling: Findings from the German Aging Survey

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society
ISSN
1444-1586
eISSN
1447-0594
D.O.I.
10.1111/ggi.13190
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionMore than 30% of community‐dwelling older individuals experience a fall each year. Therefore, and regardless of the physical consequences, some individuals develop a fear of falling (FOF). FOF is also common in older adults who have not yet experienced a fall. As FOF is strongly related to age, it is expected that the number of individuals with FOF will increase markedly as a result of demographic shifts. FOF ultimately results in social isolation, avoidance of physical activities, loss of self‐confidence, decreases in mental health and worse quality of life. Furthermore, it is associated with admissions to a nursing home and overestimation of physical capabilities. A schematic diagram of how FOF can affect balance performance was recently introduced elsewhere. Hence, it is important to know the factors associated with FOF.To date, various studies have examined the association of sociodemographic factors, functional outcomes and mental health with FOF. However, only a small body of literature has examined the psychological correlates of FOF. These studies are mostly restricted to psychological correlates that are directly related to FOF. Very few studies have found associations between FOF and general psychological factors, such as general self‐efficacy or optimism, suggesting that these general psychological correlates should

Journal

Geriatrics & Gerontology InternationalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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