Psychological antecedents of student procrastination

Psychological antecedents of student procrastination The study examined three psychological explanations for procrastination: indecision (Janis & Mann, 1977); irrational beliefs about self‐worth (Ellis & Knaus, 1977); and low self‐esteem (Burka & Yuen, 1983). Times taken by 245 students in a first‐year Psychology course to submit three separate assignments (a term‐paper outline, a term paper, and a research questionnaire) were recorded and correlated with measures of indecision, irrational beliefs, and self‐esteem, depression and anxiety. Similarly, students' self‐reported frequency of procrastination was correlated with the above measures. Small but significant correlations were found between indecision, irrational beliefs, and low self‐esteem and two measures of procrastination: time taken to submit a term paper and self‐reported frequency of procrastination. Multiple regression analyses revealed that self‐esteem and, to a lesser extent, indecision accounted for significant unique portions of the variance in procrastination. Significant correlations were also found between anxiety and depression and the two measures of procrastination. A significant negative correlation was found between self‐reported procrastination and final course grade, indicating that procrastination is detrimental to academic performance. It was found that older students (21 and over) were less likely to procrastinate than younger students. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Psychologist Wiley

Psychological antecedents of student procrastination

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/psychological-antecedents-of-student-procrastination-8WAOqND7Xw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1988 Australian Psychological Society
ISSN
0005-0067
eISSN
1742-9544
DOI
10.1080/00050068808255605
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The study examined three psychological explanations for procrastination: indecision (Janis & Mann, 1977); irrational beliefs about self‐worth (Ellis & Knaus, 1977); and low self‐esteem (Burka & Yuen, 1983). Times taken by 245 students in a first‐year Psychology course to submit three separate assignments (a term‐paper outline, a term paper, and a research questionnaire) were recorded and correlated with measures of indecision, irrational beliefs, and self‐esteem, depression and anxiety. Similarly, students' self‐reported frequency of procrastination was correlated with the above measures. Small but significant correlations were found between indecision, irrational beliefs, and low self‐esteem and two measures of procrastination: time taken to submit a term paper and self‐reported frequency of procrastination. Multiple regression analyses revealed that self‐esteem and, to a lesser extent, indecision accounted for significant unique portions of the variance in procrastination. Significant correlations were also found between anxiety and depression and the two measures of procrastination. A significant negative correlation was found between self‐reported procrastination and final course grade, indicating that procrastination is detrimental to academic performance. It was found that older students (21 and over) were less likely to procrastinate than younger students.

Journal

Australian PsychologistWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1988

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off