Programmed death ligand‐1 expression as immunotherapeutic target in sinonasal cancer

Programmed death ligand‐1 expression as immunotherapeutic target in sinonasal cancer INTRODUCTIONTumors in the sinonasal cavities represent 5% of all head and neck cancers with an incidence of approximately 0.5 of 100 000 inhabitants. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and intestinal‐type adenocarcinoma (ITAC) represent approximately 70%‐80% of sinonasal cancer, the remainder include a miscellany of neuroendocrine carcinomas, neuroectodermal neoplasms, salivary gland tumors, and undifferentiated carcinomas. Sinonasal SCC and ITAC have been etiologically related to occupational exposures, including wood and leather dust, nickel, and chromium. There are also indications that human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein‐Barr virus play a role in the development of a subset of sinonasal cancer. Diagnosis of these tumors is often late due to unspecific symptoms similar to inflammatory processes.Despite improvements in the field of surgery and radiotherapy, the prognosis is still poor with a 5‐year overall survival of 30%‐50%. Typically, all sinonasal tumors frequently develop local recurrences (50%‐80%), the main cause of death. Lymph node or distant metastasis occur in 10%‐20% of cases. For locally advanced sinonasal tumors, treatment usually is surgery combined with radiotherapy, and, in some cases, a multimodal approach, including chemotherapy. However, there is a clear need for new therapeutic options.Molecular genetic studies may guide the application of modern anticancer drugs that target specific signaling pathways. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Head & Neck: Journal for the Sciences & Specialties of the Head and Neck Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1043-3074
eISSN
1097-0347
D.O.I.
10.1002/hed.25067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONTumors in the sinonasal cavities represent 5% of all head and neck cancers with an incidence of approximately 0.5 of 100 000 inhabitants. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and intestinal‐type adenocarcinoma (ITAC) represent approximately 70%‐80% of sinonasal cancer, the remainder include a miscellany of neuroendocrine carcinomas, neuroectodermal neoplasms, salivary gland tumors, and undifferentiated carcinomas. Sinonasal SCC and ITAC have been etiologically related to occupational exposures, including wood and leather dust, nickel, and chromium. There are also indications that human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein‐Barr virus play a role in the development of a subset of sinonasal cancer. Diagnosis of these tumors is often late due to unspecific symptoms similar to inflammatory processes.Despite improvements in the field of surgery and radiotherapy, the prognosis is still poor with a 5‐year overall survival of 30%‐50%. Typically, all sinonasal tumors frequently develop local recurrences (50%‐80%), the main cause of death. Lymph node or distant metastasis occur in 10%‐20% of cases. For locally advanced sinonasal tumors, treatment usually is surgery combined with radiotherapy, and, in some cases, a multimodal approach, including chemotherapy. However, there is a clear need for new therapeutic options.Molecular genetic studies may guide the application of modern anticancer drugs that target specific signaling pathways.

Journal

Head & Neck: Journal for the Sciences & Specialties of the Head and NeckWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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