Prognoses in patients with primary gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms based on the proposed new classification scheme

Prognoses in patients with primary gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms based on the... 1INTRODUCTIONNeuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are epithelial tumors with a predominant neuroendocrine differentiation, which originate in a great diversity of tissues. The results from the National Cancer Registry for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (RGETNE) have shown that approximately half of all NENs are GI‐NENs, with highest frequency being observed in the small intestine, appendix and stomach, which significantly differ with that observed in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program tumor registry. The incidence of NENs varies between 3.24 and 6.50/100 000, a trend for higher incidence in men compared with women. In addition, GI‐NENs accounted for an increasing proportion of NENs. According to the SEER database, the incidence rate of GI‐NENs was 5.25/100 000 in 2004, with a five‐fold increase from that 30 years earlier. This increase was likely caused in part by improvements in classification of these tumors. Nowadays, surgical resection undoubtedly remains the mainstay of the potentially curative treatment for the GI‐NENs. However, NENs may be asymptomatic and clinically silent when diagnosed but some will display malignant characteristics even underwent surgical resection; they often have unpredictable biological behavior.Currently, there is no accepted uniformed grading system for NENs. The ability to stratify patients with NENs into prognostic groups could yield benefits to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology Wiley

Prognoses in patients with primary gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms based on the proposed new classification scheme

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1743-7555
eISSN
1743-7563
D.O.I.
10.1111/ajco.12760
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1INTRODUCTIONNeuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are epithelial tumors with a predominant neuroendocrine differentiation, which originate in a great diversity of tissues. The results from the National Cancer Registry for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (RGETNE) have shown that approximately half of all NENs are GI‐NENs, with highest frequency being observed in the small intestine, appendix and stomach, which significantly differ with that observed in Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program tumor registry. The incidence of NENs varies between 3.24 and 6.50/100 000, a trend for higher incidence in men compared with women. In addition, GI‐NENs accounted for an increasing proportion of NENs. According to the SEER database, the incidence rate of GI‐NENs was 5.25/100 000 in 2004, with a five‐fold increase from that 30 years earlier. This increase was likely caused in part by improvements in classification of these tumors. Nowadays, surgical resection undoubtedly remains the mainstay of the potentially curative treatment for the GI‐NENs. However, NENs may be asymptomatic and clinically silent when diagnosed but some will display malignant characteristics even underwent surgical resection; they often have unpredictable biological behavior.Currently, there is no accepted uniformed grading system for NENs. The ability to stratify patients with NENs into prognostic groups could yield benefits to

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical OncologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ;

References

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