Problems with change in R 2 as applied to theory of reasoned action research

Problems with change in R 2 as applied to theory of reasoned action research The paradigm of choice for theory of reasoned action research seems to depend largely on the notion of change in variance accounted for (ΔR2) as new independent variables are added to a multiple regression equation. If adding a particular independent variable of interest increases the variance in the dependent variable that can be accounted for by the list of independent variables, then the research is deemed to be ‘successful’, and the researcher is considered to have made a convincing argument about the importance of the new variable. In contrast to this trend, I present arguments that suggest serious problems with the paradigm, and conclude that studies on attitude‐behaviour relations would advance the field of psychology to a far greater extent if researchers abandoned it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

Problems with change in R 2 as applied to theory of reasoned action research

British Journal of Social Psychology, Volume 43 (4) – Dec 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2004 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0144-6665
eISSN
2044-8309
DOI
10.1348/0144666042565344
pmid
15601507
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paradigm of choice for theory of reasoned action research seems to depend largely on the notion of change in variance accounted for (ΔR2) as new independent variables are added to a multiple regression equation. If adding a particular independent variable of interest increases the variance in the dependent variable that can be accounted for by the list of independent variables, then the research is deemed to be ‘successful’, and the researcher is considered to have made a convincing argument about the importance of the new variable. In contrast to this trend, I present arguments that suggest serious problems with the paradigm, and conclude that studies on attitude‐behaviour relations would advance the field of psychology to a far greater extent if researchers abandoned it.

Journal

British Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2004

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