Prevalence of skin cancer in Native American kidney transplant recipients

Prevalence of skin cancer in Native American kidney transplant recipients IntroductionRisk factors for skin cancer (SC) in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) include male gender, age over 50 years, white race, thoracic organ transplantation, duration of immunosuppression, and SC history prior to transplantation. Of these risk factors, white race is associated with the highest hazard ratio (9.04) for SC development. Though the prevalence of SC in white SOTRs is well‐documented, there is limited information regarding the prevalence of SC in darker skin phototypes. Pritchett et al. conducted the most recent assessment on rates of keratinocyte carcinoma (KC) in non‐white (i.e. Black, Asian, Hispanic and Pacific Islander) SOTRs. This study found that 5.1% of non‐white KTRs developed KC, of which 73% were cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Chung et al. found that 41.6% of white SOTRs developed SC compared to 9.9% of non‐white (i.e. Asian, Hispanic, and Black) SOTRs. Although the prevalence of SC in white SOTRs and select non‐white SOTRs is documented, there is no information regarding SC prevalence in Native American SOTRs.In 2016, Native Americans received 233 solid organ transplantations, 147 of which were kidney transplants. These numbers are projected to increase because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and end stage renal disease. It is estimated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Dermatology Wiley

Prevalence of skin cancer in Native American kidney transplant recipients

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
International Journal of Dermatology © 2018 International Society of Dermatology
ISSN
0011-9059
eISSN
1365-4632
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijd.13863
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionRisk factors for skin cancer (SC) in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) include male gender, age over 50 years, white race, thoracic organ transplantation, duration of immunosuppression, and SC history prior to transplantation. Of these risk factors, white race is associated with the highest hazard ratio (9.04) for SC development. Though the prevalence of SC in white SOTRs is well‐documented, there is limited information regarding the prevalence of SC in darker skin phototypes. Pritchett et al. conducted the most recent assessment on rates of keratinocyte carcinoma (KC) in non‐white (i.e. Black, Asian, Hispanic and Pacific Islander) SOTRs. This study found that 5.1% of non‐white KTRs developed KC, of which 73% were cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Chung et al. found that 41.6% of white SOTRs developed SC compared to 9.9% of non‐white (i.e. Asian, Hispanic, and Black) SOTRs. Although the prevalence of SC in white SOTRs and select non‐white SOTRs is documented, there is no information regarding SC prevalence in Native American SOTRs.In 2016, Native Americans received 233 solid organ transplantations, 147 of which were kidney transplants. These numbers are projected to increase because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and end stage renal disease. It is estimated

Journal

International Journal of DermatologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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