Presence of hepatitis B and C viral genomes in US blood donors as detected by polymerase chain reaction amplification

Presence of hepatitis B and C viral genomes in US blood donors as detected by polymerase chain... Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a major cause of posttransfusion hepatitis worldwide. Post‐transfusion hepatitis associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to occur. HBsAg‐negative donor sera from the Rhode Island Blood Center between 1987 and 1988 were screened using more sensitive techniques to assess the prevalence of low level HBV infection. Group I consists of 866 healthy blood donors without HBV sero‐logic markers, group II consists of 377 donors with ALT elevations (>45 IU/L), group II consists of 148 donors positive for anti‐HBc, and group IV consists of eight donors positive for both surrogate markers. A sensitive monoclonal immuno‐radiometric assay (M‐IRMA) was employed for detection of HBsAg‐associated epitopes (detection limit of 20 pg/ml) in serum. A subset of sera were analyzed for the presence of HBV DNA using the method of anti‐HBs capture of HBV related virions in serum followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Using these techniques, 0.8% and 1.7% of donors were positive for HBsAg and HBV DNA respectively in group I. In contrast, 0.9% and 9.5% in group II and 0.7% and 18.1% in group III were positive, respectively. There were eight donors with both ALT elevation and anti‐HBc; and four (50%) of these were positive for HBV DNA. In the group with anti‐HBc, the majority (80%) of donors with HBV DNA had either no or low (signal to noise ratio < 10) anti‐HBs titer. Using anti‐HCV testing and reverse transcription‐PCR for detection of HCV genomes, we detected evidence of HCV infection in nine of the 49 donors with low level HBV DNA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Virology Wiley

Presence of hepatitis B and C viral genomes in US blood donors as detected by polymerase chain reaction amplification

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0146-6615
eISSN
1096-9071
D.O.I.
10.1002/jmv.1890420210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a major cause of posttransfusion hepatitis worldwide. Post‐transfusion hepatitis associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to occur. HBsAg‐negative donor sera from the Rhode Island Blood Center between 1987 and 1988 were screened using more sensitive techniques to assess the prevalence of low level HBV infection. Group I consists of 866 healthy blood donors without HBV sero‐logic markers, group II consists of 377 donors with ALT elevations (>45 IU/L), group II consists of 148 donors positive for anti‐HBc, and group IV consists of eight donors positive for both surrogate markers. A sensitive monoclonal immuno‐radiometric assay (M‐IRMA) was employed for detection of HBsAg‐associated epitopes (detection limit of 20 pg/ml) in serum. A subset of sera were analyzed for the presence of HBV DNA using the method of anti‐HBs capture of HBV related virions in serum followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Using these techniques, 0.8% and 1.7% of donors were positive for HBsAg and HBV DNA respectively in group I. In contrast, 0.9% and 9.5% in group II and 0.7% and 18.1% in group III were positive, respectively. There were eight donors with both ALT elevation and anti‐HBc; and four (50%) of these were positive for HBV DNA. In the group with anti‐HBc, the majority (80%) of donors with HBV DNA had either no or low (signal to noise ratio < 10) anti‐HBs titer. Using anti‐HCV testing and reverse transcription‐PCR for detection of HCV genomes, we detected evidence of HCV infection in nine of the 49 donors with low level HBV DNA.

Journal

Journal of Medical VirologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1994

References

  • Improved detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in blood donors by monoclonal radioimmunoassay
    Ben‐Porath, Ben‐Porath; Wands, Wands; Bar‐Shany, Bar‐Shany; Huggins, Huggins; Isselbacher, Isselbacher
  • Interference between non‐A, non‐B and hepatitis B virus infection in Chimpanzees
    Brotman, Brotman; Prince, Prince; Huima, Huima; Richardson, Richardson; van den Ende, van den Ende; Pfeifer, Pfeifer
  • Evaluation of routine anti‐HBc screening of volunteer blood donors: A questionable surrogate test for non‐A, non‐B hepatitis
    Hanson, Hanson; Polesky, Polesky
  • Prevalence of isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen in an area endemic for hepatitis B virus infection: Implication in hepatitis B vaccination program
    Lok, Lok; Lai, Lai; Wu, Wu
  • Comparison of enzyme immunoassay with radioimmunoassay for the detection of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen as the only marker of hepatitis B infection in a population with a high prevalence of hepatitis B
    Parkinson, Parkinson; McMahon, McMahon; Hall, Hall; Ritter, Ritter; Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald

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