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Preparing for the Future: Critical Challenges in Crisis Management

Preparing for the Future: Critical Challenges in Crisis Management Arjen Boin* and Patrick Lagadec** Introduction: The Changing Nature of Crisis In the field of crisis and contingencies management, there is a strong notion that crises are changing shape (Rosenthal, 1998; Kouzmin and Haynes, 1999; Rosenthal, Boin and Comfort, 2001). Crises are becoming more complex in nature, they are increasingly transboundary and interconnected; in a way, crises have become endemic features of modern society. This changing nature of crisis appears to be a logical development, given such long-term trends as globalisation, increased mass communication (`inter-wiredness'), social fragmentation and the hotly disputed dissipation of state authority. The potential impact of the future crisis is likely to grow as well. As the complexity and coupling of ever-larger, complex systems continue to increase, small disruptions will lead to rapid escalation (Perrow, 1999). The 1997 economic crisis in Asia exemplifies the speed by which seemingly minor events cascade into developments on a world-wide scale (Bisignano, Hunter and Kaufman, 2000). The global IT infrastructure has been shown vulnerable to `glitches' and viruses, with small interruptions causing tremendous damages (Rochlin, 2001). A rather pessimistic view on the crisis management capacities of public and private organisations accompanies these perspectives on crises of the future. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management Wiley

Preparing for the Future: Critical Challenges in Crisis Management

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References (25)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0966-0879
eISSN
1468-5973
DOI
10.1111/1468-5973.00138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Arjen Boin* and Patrick Lagadec** Introduction: The Changing Nature of Crisis In the field of crisis and contingencies management, there is a strong notion that crises are changing shape (Rosenthal, 1998; Kouzmin and Haynes, 1999; Rosenthal, Boin and Comfort, 2001). Crises are becoming more complex in nature, they are increasingly transboundary and interconnected; in a way, crises have become endemic features of modern society. This changing nature of crisis appears to be a logical development, given such long-term trends as globalisation, increased mass communication (`inter-wiredness'), social fragmentation and the hotly disputed dissipation of state authority. The potential impact of the future crisis is likely to grow as well. As the complexity and coupling of ever-larger, complex systems continue to increase, small disruptions will lead to rapid escalation (Perrow, 1999). The 1997 economic crisis in Asia exemplifies the speed by which seemingly minor events cascade into developments on a world-wide scale (Bisignano, Hunter and Kaufman, 2000). The global IT infrastructure has been shown vulnerable to `glitches' and viruses, with small interruptions causing tremendous damages (Rochlin, 2001). A rather pessimistic view on the crisis management capacities of public and private organisations accompanies these perspectives on crises of the future. In

Journal

Journal of Contingencies and Crisis ManagementWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2000

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