Predonation testing of potential blood donors in resource‐restricted settings

Predonation testing of potential blood donors in resource‐restricted settings We read with interest the editorial by Clark and colleagues listing their concerns about the article reporting on the implementation of predonation blood donor screening in Ghana. These concerns are not new and have been raised by WHO representatives and others for many years. It was disappointing that the authors provided a long list of assumptions reflecting opinions or personal biases but did not support them with any data or references. This approach is not conducive to a productive debate and a rational examination of the considerable body of data reported in the article. This is exemplified by stating that triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) was used as second line of blood safety in the study when it was simply used to investigate the efficacy of predonation screening with rapid tests. It is, however, the ultimate objective of this study to implement triplex NAT to determine its utility, feasibility, and effectiveness in the context of a West African resource‐poor setting. The authors put forward five reasons to be cautious of predonation screening: logistics, quality of blood banking and transfusion practices, donor confidentiality, donor counseling, and behavioral elements such as magnet effect and stigma. This gives us an opportunity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

Predonation testing of potential blood donors in resource‐restricted settings

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
DOI
10.1111/j.1537-2995.2005.00567.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We read with interest the editorial by Clark and colleagues listing their concerns about the article reporting on the implementation of predonation blood donor screening in Ghana. These concerns are not new and have been raised by WHO representatives and others for many years. It was disappointing that the authors provided a long list of assumptions reflecting opinions or personal biases but did not support them with any data or references. This approach is not conducive to a productive debate and a rational examination of the considerable body of data reported in the article. This is exemplified by stating that triplex nucleic acid testing (NAT) was used as second line of blood safety in the study when it was simply used to investigate the efficacy of predonation screening with rapid tests. It is, however, the ultimate objective of this study to implement triplex NAT to determine its utility, feasibility, and effectiveness in the context of a West African resource‐poor setting. The authors put forward five reasons to be cautious of predonation screening: logistics, quality of blood banking and transfusion practices, donor confidentiality, donor counseling, and behavioral elements such as magnet effect and stigma. This gives us an opportunity

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2005

References

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