Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states

Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1008–1018 Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia’s apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom‐up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re‐establish top–down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Letters Wiley

Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS
ISSN
1461-023X
eISSN
1461-0248
DOI
10.1111/j.1461-0248.2010.01492.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1008–1018 Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia’s apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom‐up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re‐establish top–down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity.

Journal

Ecology LettersWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2010

References

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