Precision agriculture in the 21st century: geospatial and information technologies in crop management, Committee on Assessing Crop Yield: Site‐Specific Farming, Information Systems and Research Opportunities, Board on Agriculture, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington DC, USA 1997, xii + 149 pp, price £32.95. ISBN 0‐309‐05893‐7

Precision agriculture in the 21st century: geospatial and information technologies in crop... Precision agriculture in the 21st century: geospatial and information technologies in crop management, Committee on Assessing Crop Yield: Site‐Specific Farming, Information Systems and Research Opportunities, Board on Agriculture, National Research Council National Academy Press , Washington DC, USA , 1997 xii + 149 pp, price £32.95 ISBN 0‐309‐05893‐7 Roger Plumb. This book is the outcome of a study by the US National Research Council's Board on Agriculture that addressed four key questions: (1) How can evolving technologies aid producer decision making in agricultural crop production? (2) What are the incentives for adoption and barriers to implementation of these information technologies? (3) What are the environmental, economic and social implications of precision agriculture? (4) What are the appropriate roles for the public and private sectors in improving and disseminating these technologies? The scope of the report included the adoption and effectiveness of information technologies that affect farm operations. The book is structured around these questions with four chapters, each addressing one of the questions but, to emphasise that it is a report, there is an executive summary. There is recognition that, while the term Precision Agriculture can be seductive, with images of computer‐controlled machinery linked to satellites and local sensors, it is still in its early stages and that the ability to be precise is often greater than our knowledge of how, or whether, precision is worthwhile. Precision Agriculture is defined here ‘as a management strategy that uses information technologies to bring data from multiple sources to bear on decisions associated with crop production’. The nature and origin of the report, especially the role of public and private sectors, is particularly directed to USA concerns but the more general principles are equally valid for agriculture elsewhere. However, this is not a manual for the producer, more a guide to the policy makers and potential funders, and for study by the research community. If there is one message it is one of cautious optimism that precision agriculture has the potential for improving production efficiency and sustainability, and that a more holistic and integrated approach to agricultural research is necessary. I recommend it to anyone involved in agricultural production, whether as a researcher, practitioner, policy maker or funder, as Precision Agriculture is not a passing phase but will become an increasingly important part of agriculture worldwide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pest Management Science Wiley

Precision agriculture in the 21st century: geospatial and information technologies in crop management, Committee on Assessing Crop Yield: Site‐Specific Farming, Information Systems and Research Opportunities, Board on Agriculture, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington DC, USA 1997, xii + 149 pp, price £32.95. ISBN 0‐309‐05893‐7

Pest Management Science, Volume 56 (8) – Aug 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/precision-agriculture-in-the-21st-century-geospatial-and-information-qZLv0tDa6p
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Society of Chemical Industry
ISSN
1526-498X
eISSN
1526-4998
DOI
10.1002/1526-4998(200008)56:8<723::AID-PS141>3.0.CO;2-Z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Precision agriculture in the 21st century: geospatial and information technologies in crop management, Committee on Assessing Crop Yield: Site‐Specific Farming, Information Systems and Research Opportunities, Board on Agriculture, National Research Council National Academy Press , Washington DC, USA , 1997 xii + 149 pp, price £32.95 ISBN 0‐309‐05893‐7 Roger Plumb. This book is the outcome of a study by the US National Research Council's Board on Agriculture that addressed four key questions: (1) How can evolving technologies aid producer decision making in agricultural crop production? (2) What are the incentives for adoption and barriers to implementation of these information technologies? (3) What are the environmental, economic and social implications of precision agriculture? (4) What are the appropriate roles for the public and private sectors in improving and disseminating these technologies? The scope of the report included the adoption and effectiveness of information technologies that affect farm operations. The book is structured around these questions with four chapters, each addressing one of the questions but, to emphasise that it is a report, there is an executive summary. There is recognition that, while the term Precision Agriculture can be seductive, with images of computer‐controlled machinery linked to satellites and local sensors, it is still in its early stages and that the ability to be precise is often greater than our knowledge of how, or whether, precision is worthwhile. Precision Agriculture is defined here ‘as a management strategy that uses information technologies to bring data from multiple sources to bear on decisions associated with crop production’. The nature and origin of the report, especially the role of public and private sectors, is particularly directed to USA concerns but the more general principles are equally valid for agriculture elsewhere. However, this is not a manual for the producer, more a guide to the policy makers and potential funders, and for study by the research community. If there is one message it is one of cautious optimism that precision agriculture has the potential for improving production efficiency and sustainability, and that a more holistic and integrated approach to agricultural research is necessary. I recommend it to anyone involved in agricultural production, whether as a researcher, practitioner, policy maker or funder, as Precision Agriculture is not a passing phase but will become an increasingly important part of agriculture worldwide.

Journal

Pest Management ScienceWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off