Post‐transfusion changes in serum hepcidin and iron parameters in preterm infants

Post‐transfusion changes in serum hepcidin and iron parameters in preterm infants Iron is an essential micronutrient that plays a significant role in critical cellular functions. Anemia and iron deficiency are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Compromised iron stores combined with rapid growth, accelerated erythropoiesis and frequent blood sampling render preterm neonates at high risk for iron deficiency and consequent anemia. Even though most hospitalized premature infants require red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, little is known about the way transfusions alter the iron status in those newborns.Hepcidin acts as a negative feedback regulator of iron homeostasis by binding to ferroportin, inducing internalization and degradation of ferroportin, leading to limited iron entry into the extracellular fluid. Several factors are known to influence hepcidin expression such as inflammatory cytokines, plasma iron level, anemia and hypoxia. Much of our knowledge on iron homeostasis is based on studies of animal models or adult humans. Currently very little is known about the regulation of hepcidin production in neonates, especially preterm ones. Immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and high‐light‐scatter reticulocytes (HLR) are two relatively new reticulocyte parameters that reflect potential bone marrow erythropoiesis. IRF is a reliable indicator of erythropoietic rate because it refers to more immature reticulocytes with higher RNA content. HLR is used in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatrics International Wiley

Post‐transfusion changes in serum hepcidin and iron parameters in preterm infants

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Japan Pediatric Society
ISSN
1328-8067
eISSN
1442-200X
D.O.I.
10.1111/ped.13478
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Iron is an essential micronutrient that plays a significant role in critical cellular functions. Anemia and iron deficiency are very common in neonatal intensive care units. Compromised iron stores combined with rapid growth, accelerated erythropoiesis and frequent blood sampling render preterm neonates at high risk for iron deficiency and consequent anemia. Even though most hospitalized premature infants require red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, little is known about the way transfusions alter the iron status in those newborns.Hepcidin acts as a negative feedback regulator of iron homeostasis by binding to ferroportin, inducing internalization and degradation of ferroportin, leading to limited iron entry into the extracellular fluid. Several factors are known to influence hepcidin expression such as inflammatory cytokines, plasma iron level, anemia and hypoxia. Much of our knowledge on iron homeostasis is based on studies of animal models or adult humans. Currently very little is known about the regulation of hepcidin production in neonates, especially preterm ones. Immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and high‐light‐scatter reticulocytes (HLR) are two relatively new reticulocyte parameters that reflect potential bone marrow erythropoiesis. IRF is a reliable indicator of erythropoietic rate because it refers to more immature reticulocytes with higher RNA content. HLR is used in

Journal

Pediatrics InternationalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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