Post‐revolutionary State Building in Ethiopia, Iran and Nicaragua: Lessons from Terror

Post‐revolutionary State Building in Ethiopia, Iran and Nicaragua: Lessons from Terror This paper focuses on an earlier theorized critical stage of revolution, the Reign of Terror which is redefined with summary justice as its essence and employed in a comparative analysis of three modern revolutions, Ethiopia, Iran and Nicaragua. The analysis demonstrates the importance of national factors over international factors in explaining post‐revolutionary state construction. A reign of terror is an extemporized state; it is not an inevitable stage of revolution. Comparison of Ethiopia and Iran, where terrors occurred, is contrasted with Nicaragua, where a reign of terror was avoided. This reveals the significance for post‐revolutionary state construction of the timing and outcome of civil war, of domestic policy choices constrained by circumstances directly encountered and of state control over new, revolutionary, means of coercion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Political Studies Wiley

Post‐revolutionary State Building in Ethiopia, Iran and Nicaragua: Lessons from Terror

Political Studies, Volume 48 (5) – Dec 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Political Studies Association 2000
ISSN
0032-3217
eISSN
1467-9248
DOI
10.1111/1467-9248.00290
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper focuses on an earlier theorized critical stage of revolution, the Reign of Terror which is redefined with summary justice as its essence and employed in a comparative analysis of three modern revolutions, Ethiopia, Iran and Nicaragua. The analysis demonstrates the importance of national factors over international factors in explaining post‐revolutionary state construction. A reign of terror is an extemporized state; it is not an inevitable stage of revolution. Comparison of Ethiopia and Iran, where terrors occurred, is contrasted with Nicaragua, where a reign of terror was avoided. This reveals the significance for post‐revolutionary state construction of the timing and outcome of civil war, of domestic policy choices constrained by circumstances directly encountered and of state control over new, revolutionary, means of coercion.

Journal

Political StudiesWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2000

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