Possible role of atmosphere‐biosphere interactions in triggering the Last Glaciation

Possible role of atmosphere‐biosphere interactions in triggering the Last Glaciation We coupled a global biome model iteratively with an atmospheric general circulation model to study the possible role of vegetation in the climate system, at the time of glacial inception 115,000 years ago. Orbital forcing alone was not sufficient to initiate glaciation when other components of the climate system were kept as present (atmospheric composition, oceans, biosphere and cryosphere). Summers were however cold enough to induce major vegetation shifts in high northern latitudes. Southward migration of the boreal forest/tundra limit helped to create favourable conditions for continental ice‐sheet growth, with increasing snow depth and duration in Labrador, Arctic Canada and northern/western Fennoscandia. These results support a role for biogeophysical feedback in initiating glaciations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Research Letters Wiley

Possible role of atmosphere‐biosphere interactions in triggering the Last Glaciation

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0094-8276
eISSN
1944-8007
DOI
10.1029/96GL03004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We coupled a global biome model iteratively with an atmospheric general circulation model to study the possible role of vegetation in the climate system, at the time of glacial inception 115,000 years ago. Orbital forcing alone was not sufficient to initiate glaciation when other components of the climate system were kept as present (atmospheric composition, oceans, biosphere and cryosphere). Summers were however cold enough to induce major vegetation shifts in high northern latitudes. Southward migration of the boreal forest/tundra limit helped to create favourable conditions for continental ice‐sheet growth, with increasing snow depth and duration in Labrador, Arctic Canada and northern/western Fennoscandia. These results support a role for biogeophysical feedback in initiating glaciations.

Journal

Geophysical Research LettersWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1996

References

  • Milankovitch theory and climate
    Berger, Berger
  • BIOME3: An equilibrium terrestrial biosphere model based on ecophysiological constraints, resource availability and competition among plant functional types
    Haxeltine, Haxeltine; Prentice, Prentice
  • On the structure and origin of major glaciation cycles. 2. The 100,000‐year cycle
    Imbrie, Imbrie
  • Growth and decay of the Laurentide ice sheet and comparison with Fenno‐Scandinavia
    Ives, Ives; Andrews, Andrews; Barry, Barry

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