Positive experiences related to living with tinnitus: A cross‐sectional survey

Positive experiences related to living with tinnitus: A cross‐sectional survey KeypointsA third of this cross‐section reported positive experiences associated with tinnitus. The majority only reported one positive experience, although up to eight were reported.Participants who were younger, had lower hearing disability and fewer cognitive failures were more likely to report positive experiences related to experiencing tinnitus.Positive experiences were related to being able to better cope with the tinnitus, the support received and a change in outlook.INTRODUCTIONTinnitus is defined as the percept of sound in the absence of a corresponding external stimuli. It is highly prevalent, affecting an estimated 10%‐17% of the adult population across the globe. Despite its prevalence, a cure to permanently abolish tinnitus is yet to be found. In addition, this chronic condition can be debilitating due to various secondary consequences, including insomnia, reduced concentration, anxiety and depression. Understanding the impact of these effects on an individual's activity and associated psychological consequences is important. The World Health Organisation has, therefore, developed an International Classification of Functioning framework (ICF). This classification system is based on the biopsychosocial perspective that suggests that any health condition can have both positive and negative consequences. The focus is generally on the negative impact of health conditions. It is also important to understand http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Otolaryngology Wiley

Positive experiences related to living with tinnitus: A cross‐sectional survey

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
1749-4478
eISSN
1749-4486
D.O.I.
10.1111/coa.13002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

KeypointsA third of this cross‐section reported positive experiences associated with tinnitus. The majority only reported one positive experience, although up to eight were reported.Participants who were younger, had lower hearing disability and fewer cognitive failures were more likely to report positive experiences related to experiencing tinnitus.Positive experiences were related to being able to better cope with the tinnitus, the support received and a change in outlook.INTRODUCTIONTinnitus is defined as the percept of sound in the absence of a corresponding external stimuli. It is highly prevalent, affecting an estimated 10%‐17% of the adult population across the globe. Despite its prevalence, a cure to permanently abolish tinnitus is yet to be found. In addition, this chronic condition can be debilitating due to various secondary consequences, including insomnia, reduced concentration, anxiety and depression. Understanding the impact of these effects on an individual's activity and associated psychological consequences is important. The World Health Organisation has, therefore, developed an International Classification of Functioning framework (ICF). This classification system is based on the biopsychosocial perspective that suggests that any health condition can have both positive and negative consequences. The focus is generally on the negative impact of health conditions. It is also important to understand

Journal

Clinical OtolaryngologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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